Oscars 2013: what it’s like to win by Simon Chinn | The Guardian

Simon Chinn, left, and Searching for Sugar Man's director Malik Bendjelloul with their Oscars. Photograph: Xinhua/Landov/Barcroft Media
Simon Chinn, left, and Searching for Sugar Man’s director Malik Bendjelloul with their Oscars. Photograph: Xinhua/Landov/Barcroft Media

Simon Chinn, British producer of best documentary Searching for Sugar Man, describes his ‘surreal experience’

Phew. That’s better, now I’ve got a cup of tea in my hand. Famous? It’s only a documentary, for Christ’s sake. But yes … it was amazing.

It is such a surreal experience. We documentary makers don’t get to mix with real Hollywood, but it had got very good distribution in the States so a lot of people knew about it. I met a lot of properly famous people. I had Joan Collins fondling my Oscar. I wished Daniel Day-Lewis luck before he went on – a great win that, he is a class act.

I’d been there before, when I won for Man on Wire, so I knew the drill a little bit – but I’m not sure if that really helps much. For the first time this year, thanks to the changes introduced by Michael Moore, all the members of the academy got to vote on it, 6,000 people who all got DVDs instead of just the documentary sector of about 170. So it was a much more level playing field, and it felt like a good year to win.

Read more at Oscars 2013: what it’s like to win | Film | The Guardian.

Sugar on his way to the Oscars

This room is where the Searching for Sugar Man story all started, and the story just continues to have more and more happy endings …

All dressed up and ready to go ... to the Oscars
All dressed up and ready to go … to the Oscars

‘Searching For Sugar Man’ wins the Oscar | iafrica.com

Malik Bendjelloul and Simon Chinn accept the Best Documentary Feature award for Searching for Sugar Man. Getty Images
Malik Bendjelloul and Simon Chinn accept the Best Documentary Feature award for Searching for Sugar Man. Getty Images

Searching for Sugar Man, about a singer whose musical star faded without a trace until he was rediscovered in South Africa, won the best documentary feature Oscar on Sunday.

The film tells the story of Sixto Rodriguez, who made two albums in the early 1970s but then quit music – and who knows nothing about his fame on another continent.

The documentary was made by first-time director Malik Bendjelloul, who first discovered Rodriguez while travelling for six months in Africa in 2006, and was fascinated by his story.

The award was accepted by Bendjelloul and producer Simon Chinn, who explained why Rodriguez did not attend the Oscars show at the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood.

via iafrica.com | entertainment | awards season | news | ‘Sugar Man’ wins the Oscar.

RODRIGUEZ FOR THE FIRST TIME IN NORWAY: Øyafestivalen

RODRIGUEZ FOR THE FIRST TIME IN NORWAY: Øyafestivalen
RODRIGUEZ FOR THE FIRST TIME IN NORWAY: Øyafestivalen

Rodriguez has reached a large audience internationally after the success of the documentary Searching For Sugar Man. Thursday the 8th of August he plays in the park during The Øya Festival. This will be his first visit to Norway and his only concert in Scandinavia this summer.

RODRIGUEZ (US)

The documentary Searching For Sugar Man has become a huge international success. The story is about the musician Sixto Rodriguez, who released a couple of very good albums in the 70′s. They sold unfortunately close to nothing in the US and Rodriguez put his career on hold.

Rodriguez’s story is unique. We highly recommend that you see the movie Searching For Sugar Man yourself. Here you will meet the personality, family man and the wonderful songwriter Sixto Rodriguez. Many years after he ended his music career, he found an enthusiastic audience he had no idea that existed. With the movie about this touching story, he has reached a huge audience in many parts of the world. He is now playing bigger and bigger venues in Europe and the USA. It is a pleasure to announce that his only concert in Scandinavia this summer, will be at The Øya Festival.

If you need a musical introduction, you might as well start with the film’s soundtrack. We are looking forward to hearing songs like Sugar Man, Crucify Your Mind, Cause and all the other gems in the park on Thursday 8th of August.

http://sugarman.org/

via RODRIGUEZ FOR THE FIRST TIME IN NORWAY : Øyafestivalen.

 

Discovering hippies and teen rebellion when ‘Searching for Sugar Man’ | Arts and Culture | Music | Mail & Guardian

Rodriguez’s magical transformation into a hero around the world has proved old South African hippies right — for once.

Rodriguez
Rodriguez

‘You know then,” said Stephen Segerman.

It was last Sunday morning and I’d spent the weekend googling recent developments in the story of Rodriguez, the construction worker who woke up one morning to discover he was actually a pop star in a parallel universe called Mzanzi. I checked his appearances on big-time American TV talk shows, scanned emotional fan mail on his website and watched several clips of foreign audiences erupting in standing ovations after screenings of Searching for Sugar Man, Malik Bendjelloul’s magical documentary about Rodriguez’s life, death and miraculous resurrection.

Somewhere along the line, it struck me that Rodriguez’s global triumph is actually a huge compliment to people like me — white South Africans born in the baby boom, raised on the apartheid moonbase and converted in the Sixties to the cause of long hair and teen rebellion. The rest of you would not get it, so I ran my idea past Segerman, who laughed and said: “You know then,” thereby identifying himself as an ex-hippie of exactly my own persuasion.

As the whole world is now aware, Segerman is the psychedelic music enthusiast who set out in the 1990s to unravel the mystery of the missing Sugar Man. Rodriguez was supposed to be dead, but Segerman and Craig Bartholomew found him living in poverty in Detroit’s ruined downtown and brought him back to South Africa, where he stood dazed and dumbfounded in an outpouring of love from thousands of fans who had waited decades to see his face.

via Discovering hippies and teen rebellion when ‘Searching for Sugar Man’ | Arts and Culture | Music | Mail & Guardian.

Truth and Beauty: “Searching for Sugar Man”

Truth and Beauty: "Searching for Sugar Man"

What happens to gifted artists who slip through the cracks?

Searching for Sugar Man” takes us on an 85-minute journey to answer this question. We begin in the backseat of a convertible driving along a winding mountain highway, with the ocean on the right. The setting:  South Africa, where Mexican-American musician Sixto Rodriguez has a huge cult following. The narrator is in search of Rodriguez, but has no idea if he’s among the living, having heard that Rodriguez burned himself alive on stage.

Cut.

Detroit. Some time in the mid-to-late ’60s. A foggy night.

“Here’s this voice,” says the speaker, who followed his ears into a dark, smoky bar, where he saw just a shadow in the back of the room. Moving closer, he noticed a singer hunched over an acoustic guitar, with his back turned to the crowd. Who was this man? 

One local who had bumped into Rodriguez in different areas of Detroit describes him as a “wandering spirit around the city,” and concludes “I thought he was a drifter.” A session musician who discovered Rodriguez and later co-produced his first album had no idea where Rodriguez lived at the time; he always asked to meet at a corner, then seemed to appear out of nowhere.

Truth and Beauty: "Searching for Sugar Man"

What we do know is that Rodriguez was a no-nonsense street poet who channeled his hard surroundings in Detroit, called “the city of small hopes” by one of his daughters.

Rodriguez’s first release, “Cold Fact” (1970), was a mix of blues, Dylanesque protest folk, singer-songwriter pop, and straight-up rock. Rodriguez’s voice and acoustic guitar drive the sound, while his co-arrangers add flute, horns, strings, and assorted psychedelia.

Cut.

Palm Springs, CA. Steve Rowland, the producer of Rodriguez’s second album, “Coming from Reality” (1971), pulls out a book of photos he hasn’t looked at in 35 years, the last time he saw Rodriguez. As always, Rodriguez is hidden behind sunglasses in all of the photographs.

At the time Rowland produced “Reality,” he thought Rodriguez might be destined to fame and fortune, but the album went nowhere in the U.S.

Rodriguez was dropped from his label two weeks before Christmas, and disappeared.

Back to South Africa. Cape Town in the early ’70s. The country is  led by an oppressive, reactionary government that outlaws television, allows no independent media, and censors albums. Civil servants listen to records before they hit the racks, and scratch the grooves of any songs deemed offensive to make them unlistenable.

“Cold Fact” finds its way into South Africa via bootlegs and spreads like wildfire. Its messages of freedom and dissent appeal to young people bridling under a closed society which is isolated by government controls and external sanctions against a brutal Apartheid regime.

Truth and Beauty: "Searching for Sugar Man"

One of the kids liberated by “Cold Fact” is Stephen Segerman, who goes on a search for Rodriguez in the ’90s.

There are few concrete, cold facts about the artist known as Rodriguez. The songwriting credits on his debut album list three different names; album jacket photos from more than two decades earlier are all Segerman has to go on. In the liner notes to a South African label’s re-release of “Cold Fact,” Segerman asks if there are “any musicologist detectives out there?” who can help him in his quest.

Music journalist Craig Bartholomew Strydom finds out about the hunt and joins forces with Segerman, though he has heard a rumor that Rodriguez had fatally shot himself onstage after being booed.

Strydom follows the money, the route the royalties from Rodriguez’s platinum album sales in South Africa have traveled. He interviews Clarence Avant, the head of Rodriguez’s Sussex label. Avant praises Rodriguez’s work, but has no insight into why he flopped in his native country while his Detroit contemporaries (Grand Funk Railroad, Ted Nugent, Iggy Pop, Bob Seger) went on to successful careers. Avant has no answers about the royalties or Rodriguez’s fate after being dumped from the label.

In 1997, Segerman and Strydom set up a website dedicated to Rodriguez which solicits leads on the musician’s whereabouts.

A year later, they find a post from one Eva Rodriguez, who says she has information they might want. But she warns that “Sometimes the fantasy is best left alone.”

Truth and Beauty: "Searching for Sugar Man"

Segerman thought the story was over soon after finding this post, but it was just beginning. The last third of “Sugar Man” carries a number of surprises that I won’t reveal; do yourself a favor and see this movie.

Narrative arc aside, the heart of “Searching for Sugar Man” is a meditation on the power of art to transform and transcend reality.

As a co-worker points out, Rodriguez elevated the prosaic and the mundane, and turned the raw material of life into art, not unlike a silkworm. The interviewee then asks the audience, “Have you done that?”

© Dan Benbow, 2013

Reprinted by kind permission of Truth and Beauty: “Searching for Sugar Man”.

The Amazing Story of Rodriguez | JeffProbst.com

“Searching for Sugar Man” is the Oscar-nominated documentary that tells the unbelievable true story of a famous musician who had no idea he was famous! On today’s show, Jeff uncovers the compelling story of folk singer Rodriguez when he talks to Malik Bendjelloul, the film’s director, and Rodriguez himself. Check it out in this video!

via The Amazing Story of Rodriguez | JeffProbst.com.

Wife of Oscar-nominated ‘Searching for Sugar Man’ star Rodriguez says he’ll stay in $50 Detroit home | MLive.com

Searching for Sugar Man" star Rodriguez appears to be staying put in Detroit - even if he wins an Oscar next month.  Associated Press
Searching for Sugar Man” star Rodriguez appears to be staying put in Detroit – even if he wins an Oscar next month. Associated Press

DETROIT, MI – Don’t expect fame to change Rodriguez, a 70-year-old partially-blind folk singer from Detroit who is the star of a documentary film nominated for an Oscar.

The focus of the “Searching for Sugar Man” film is expected to stay put in a Detroit home in the city’s Woodbridge neighborhood he bought for $50 back in 1976 during a federal government land auction.

That’s the word from Konny Rodriguez, his second wife, who had a daughter with him and has been married to him since 1984.

via Wife of Oscar-nominated ‘Searching for Sugar Man’ star Rodriguez says he’ll stay in $50 Detroit home | MLive.com.

Rodriguez to bridge 42-year album gap? | News | phantom.ie

Rodriguez
Rodriguez

Forget the five years it took for The Stone Roses to produce Second Coming, or the 22 years it will have taken My Bloody Valentine to follow-up Loveless.

Rodriguez, the focus of Oscar-nominated documentary Searching For Sugar Man, could be about to record his first album since 1971’s Coming From Reality.

Speaking to Rolling Stone, Rodriguez says he may explore the idea of recording a follow-up with his last album’s producer, Steve Rowland.

Read more at Rodriguez to bridge 42-year album gap? | News | phantom.ie.

Rich Folks Hoax

In 1987 when I was busking my way around Spain, this song received the best response, and the most money into my open guitar case. – Craig Bartholomew Strydom

 

 

Rich Folks Hoax is available on the Cold Fact album.

 

Lyrics

The moon is hanging in the purple sky
The baby’s sleeping while its mother sighs

Talking ’bout the rich folks
Rich folks have the same jokes
And they park in basic places.

The priest is preaching from a shallow grave
He counts his money, then he paints you saved

Talking to the young folks
Young folks share the same jokes
But they meet in older places.

So don’t tell me about your success
Nor your recipes for my happiness
Smoke in bed
I never could digest
Those illusions you claim to have going.

The sun is shining, as it’s always done
Coffin dust is the fate of everyone

Talking ’bout the rich folks
The poor create the rich hoax
And only late breast-fed fools believe it.

So don’t tell me about your success
Nor your recipes for my happiness
Smoke in bed
I never could digest
Those illusions you claim to have going.

 

Selected Videos (Rodriguez live and cover versions)

 


Chords (transcribed by Guy Buttery)

Am                          Dm     E 
The moon is hanging in a purple sky
Am                            Dm     E 
Baby's sleeping while his mother sighs
Dm  E                 Am
Talking about the rich folks
                            Dm
The rich folks have the same jokes
             E             Am
But they park in basic places


The priest is preaching from a shallow grave
Counts his money, then he paints you saved
Talking 'bout the young folks
Young folks share the same jokes
But they meet in older places


CHORUS: 
    Dm    E            Am
So don't tell me about your success
Dm         E              Am
Nor your recipes for my happiness
Dm        E             Am
Smoke in bed, I never could digest
        Dm       E                 Am
Those illusions you claim to have going

The sun is shining as it always done
Coffin dust is the fate of everyone
Talking about the rich folks
The poor create the rich hoax
And only late breast fed fools believe it


CHORUS:

Malik Bendjelloul talks about his Oscar-nominated movie ‘Searching for Sugar Man’ | Yahoo! Movies Oscars Blog – Yahoo! Movies

'Searching for Sugar Man' (Photo: Everett Collection)
‘Searching for Sugar Man’ (Photo: Everett Collection)

The Oscar-nominated documentary “Searching for Sugar Man” tells the strange story of singer-songwriter Rodriguez. Back in the early 1970s, the record company had high hopes for him. With eminently hummable tunes and lyrics that eloquently spoke to life on the mean streets of Detroit, Rodriguez seemed poised to be the next Bob Dylan. But his two albums, “Cold Facts” and “Coming from Reality,” never really caught on in the United States. That would seem to be the end of the story, except, for reasons that still aren’t entirely clear, Rodriguez’s album did, unbeknownst to him, phenomenally well in South Africa. His songs proved to be the anthems of a generation of young South Africans who were increasingly frustrated by their government’s apartheid policies. While his albums were selling as well as “Abbey Road” in Cape Town, Rodriguez seemingly disappeared into obscurity.

“Searching for Sugar Man” also follows some hardcore South African fans, such as Steve “Sugar” Segerman, who grew fascinated by the mysterious origins of his favorite albums. Over many years, he eventually managed to track down the musician, who was living like a Zen monk in a rundown section of the Motor City.

I talked with the movie’s director, Swedish filmmaker Malik Bendjelloul, a couple of weeks ago, just before the Oscar nominations were announced. He talked about discovering the strange story of Rodriguez and his own difficulties with getting the movie made, which included having to shoot part of the film on his iPhone. “Searching for Sugar Man” comes out this week on DVD.

via Malik Bendjelloul talks about his Oscar-nominated movie ‘Searching for Sugar Man’ | Yahoo! Movies Oscars Blog – Yahoo! Movies.

Tour news: Sugar Man on his way – Entertainment – NZ Herald News

Sixto Rodriguez, the Mexican-American singer-songwriter who is enjoying a renaissance more than 40 years after releasing his two and only albums, will play New Zealand for the first time in March.

He plays the Wellington Opera House on March 16 and Auckland’s Logan Campbell Centre on March 17.

Better known as Rodriguez, the Detroit native recorded his tough folk rock debut Cold Fact in 1970 – which included his best-known song, Sugar Man – and follow-up Coming From Reality in 1971, but they never took off in his homeland. Following this lack of interest in his music he went back to renovation and restoration work to support his family, and even ran for the mayor of Detroit at one stage, while still continuing to perform on the side.

via Tour news: Sugar Man on his way – Entertainment – NZ Herald News.

‘Sugar Man’ Star Rodriguez Headed to Coachella, Glastonbury | Billboard

Q&A With Singer and the Director of Oscar-Nominated ‘Searching for Sugar Man’

Rodriguez
Rodriguez

Rodriguez, the singer whose story is at the heart of Malik Bendjelloul’s Oscar-nominated “Searching for Sugar Man,” has festival dates lined up at Coachella, Glastonbury and Primavera in Spain that will follow tours of South Africa and Australia.

The new dates are part of astonishing rediscovery of Rodriguez, now 70, who made two albums for Clarence Avant’s Sussex label in the early 1970s that were flops everywhere except in South Africa where his legend grew along with his record sales. Bendjelloul’s film, which Sony is releasing on DVD Jan. 22, chronicles the myths and realities of Rodriguez’s story and his 1998 concerts in South Africa.

via ‘Sugar Man’ Star Rodriguez Headed to Coachella, Glastonbury | Billboard.

The Complete Rodriguez Collection | George “Fuzzy” Fazakas

George “Fuzzy” Fazakas has compiled his idea for a complete Rodriguez box set.

CD1
1)  I’ll slip away (1967 single version)
2)  You’d like to admit it (1967 b-side single version)
3)  Cold Fact
4)  After the Fact / Coming from Reality

CD2
1) I’ll slip away 1972/3
2)  Street Boy 1972/3
3)  Can’t Get away
4)  Live Fact (1998 South African tour)
CD3
1)  Alive (1979 Australian tour, released 1981)
2)  You’d like to admit it (live 2012 sept. 2 Northhampton)
3)  Last Request (Paolo Nutini song) (live 2012 sept. 2 Northhampton)
4)  Live at the Roundhouse November 2012 (You’d Like to admit it – with full band, Like a Rolling Stone, Fever, etc)
5) I’m Gonna Live Till I Die (Frank Sinatra cover) (Live At The Triple Door, Seattle – June 23, 2009)

2012 has been the year of Rodriguez.

The NME described it best in the headline for their end of 2012 round up as the year “The World Fell In Love With Rodriguez“, and that pretty much sums it up….

We at SugarMan.org wish Rodriguez, Eva, Sandra, Regan, and all the Rodriguez Family, and of course Malik, Craig, Matt and Camilla, a wonderful, happy, healthy and prosperous New Year 2013.

And to everyone who contributed articles, blogs, pictures, emails, stories, experiences or just messages of love and support for Rodriguez to the SugarMan.org website during 2012, we thank you with all our hearts.

It has always been a sincere privilege for us to have been a part of this great man and musician’s journey for the past 15 years, and we look forward to continuing to bring you All The Facts about Rodriguez, so keep reading and listening.

Love, Peace and Music to you all!

Sugar and Brian.

“Sugar Man, you’re the answer, that makes our questions disappear”

Website Powered by WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: