Colours To My Dreams

This mix opens with a recent cover version of “Sugar Man” by South African singer Rebekah Thompson.

This version plays under the closing credits of the 2019 film “Moffie” which is about a young man drafted into South Africa’s military, but he knows he is different and must keep himself hidden.

1. Sugar Man (from Moffie) – Rebekah Thompson
2. Heart Of Glass (Crabtree remix) – Blondie & Philip Glass
3. Adagio In G Minor – The Doors
4. Oblivion – M83 feat Susanne Sundfør
5. The Black Page #1 (piano version) – Ruth Underwood
6. Love Scene (from Zabriskie Point) – Richard Wright
7. The Rains Of Castamere (from Game Of Thrones) – Ramin Djawadi & Serj Tankian
8. Skyrim (Dragonborn) – Tina Guo
9. Sweet Dreams (Are Made Of This) – Emily Browning
10. Chasing The Dragon – Epica
11. Nymphetamine (Fix) – Cradle Of Filth feat Liv Kristine
12. Crazy In Love (2014 version) from Fifty Shades Of Grey – Beyoncé
13. Tomorrow Never Knows (from Sucker Punch) – Alison Mosshart & Carla Azar
14. Oh! Darling – Peachy Keen
15. Sugar Man – Barbara Moleko

The Songs of Rodriguez

“…Climb up on my music and my songs will set you free…”

Originally appeared on SugarMan.org

Sugar Man

Probably Rodriguez’s most well-known song. Rodriguez himself is also often referred to as The Sugar Man. A great song with superb instrumentation. This slow bluesy rock song is a paean to his drug dealer, however Rodriguez said on a TV interview in March 1998 that this song is “descriptive not prescriptive”. Great imagery and use of hippy slang, like “silver magic ships” and “sweet Mary Jane”, ensure the listeners’ interest. The psychedelic freak-out section in the middle reminds me of similar sections in Led Zeppelin’s ‘Whole Lotta Love’ and Uriah Heep’s ‘Gypsy’.
– Brian Currin, 1998

Cold Fact” opens with the ultra trippy Sugar Man, which may well have been straight out of an acid trip. “Sugar man met a false friend on a lonely dusty road, lost my heart, when I found it, it had turned to dead black coal” suggests just where exactly the inspiration came from as he goes on to list jumpers, coke and sweet Mary Jane. More than any other Rodriguez song, it is Sugar Man which personifies the artist in the minds of those who have always wondered. The eerie moog synthesizer, whistling in the background, the lazy and simple guitar chords and the dreamy nasal voice place the listener firmly in an era of fantasy. It sets a perfect tone for the album and the myth.
– Andrew Bond, 1998

I’m not for drugs, I never advocated drug taking
– Rodriguez, March 1998

What’s that song about anyway?
– Rodriguez, 22 September 2001

This track was the first encore song on the 1998 South African tour. It was preceded by much chanting of “Su-gar Man, Su-gar Man…”. Were we calling for the song or the Man? Who knows, but he came and he sang and we loved it.

South African band Just Jinger also did a great cover of this song on their March 1998 EP “Something For Now”.

There have also been cover versions recorded by American band The Monkey Wrench and Australian band Stella One Eleven.

Kris Kristofferson recorded a completely different song called “Sugar Man” in 1972. Released on the “Jesus Was A Capricorn” album.

In 1991 The Escape Club also recorded a song titled “Sugar Man” (no relation to the Rodriguez song) on their “Dollars And Sex” CD.

In 2001 Rapper Nas sampled “Sugar Man” for his “You’re Da Man” track off “Stillmatic”.

In the December 2002 issue of UK music mag, MOJO, in the list “The 100 Greatest Drug Songs Ever!” “Sugarman” was at number 34.

You’d Like To Admit It

Extremely rare b-side of a seven single recorded in 1967 and credited to Rod Riguez.

I Wonder

This classic folk-rock song is the one that most people seem to associate with Rodriguez. Used as the show opener on the 1998 and 2001 SA tours. Simple in composition but penetrating in it’s lyrics.

It came as no surprise then that when “Cold Fact” hit the record racks, it became a hit, simply because it contained a phrase which would muddy the country’s sexually chaste waters and serve as a mantra to the youth: I wonder, how many times you’ve had sex…
– Craig Bartholomew, 1997

Generation EXT’s slow hip-hop rap version of I Wonder was released on the compilation CD “Dance Connexion 17” in September 1998.

Only Good For Conversation

Classic fuzz metal guitar riff by Dennis Coffey opens this song, reminds me of Deep Purple’s ‘Smoke On The Water’. A harsh bitter song of lost love (..you’re the coldest bitch I know..), this track really rocks! Great bass line and a superb guitar solo.
– Brian Currin, 1998

Climb Up On My Music

My favourite Rodriguez song and also one of my all-time favourite songs. Brilliant title and great lyrics. Excellent rock guitar from Chris Spedding and jazzy piano (by Phil Dennys?) make this song a classic. Wonderful production by Steve Rowland and superb stereo imaging.
Listen to it!!

When performed live on the 1998 South African tour this track became a classic rock song of anthemic proportions. Willem Möller’s guitar solo is one of my magic moments in music.
– Brian Currin, 1998

Sandrevan Lullaby

A wonderful instrumental duet for acoustic guitar and violin. Used as the intro for “Lifestyles”. Written by Rodriguez for his 2 daughters, Sandra and Eva. Sometimes mistitled as Sundrevan Lullaby.

…the musical part of Sandrevan Lullaby touches my heart (named after my sister Sandra and me)…
– Eva Rodriguez, 1997

Rehearsed for the 1998 SA tour, but not performed (I know ‘coz I was there!)
– Brian Currin, 1998

Rich Folks Hoax

Great song, what more can I say – listen to the words.

Craig Bartholomew told me that in 1987 when he was busking his way around Spain, this song received the best response, and the most money into his open guitar case!

Covered by Amanda Strydom in September 2003.
– Brian Currin, 2003

Hate Street Dialogue

Not written by Rodriguez, but sure sounds like it could have been. “Hate Street Dialogue” actually refers to the famous “Haight/Ashbury” area of San Francisco, the famous Hippie hang-out during the late 60s “Summer Of Love”.

…for years the title Hate Street Dialogue has been bothering me, when I listened to the song I gathered the lyrics were referring to the famous hippie street in San Francisco: Haight/Ashbury, however the title on the album is spelt “Hate”. Rodriguez said (on a South African radio phone-in show in March 1998) that although the lyrics of that particular song were not written by himself they did refer to the Haight and not to the opposite of love.
– Stelios, 1998

Read the full amazing story of Hate Street Dialogue.

Jane S Piddy

Could this be “Janis Pity” – a sort of tribute to Janis Joplin? Read the lyrics and see the similarity to Janis and her lifestyle. Lyrics like “now you sit there thinking, feeling insecure…” and “…don’t bother to buy insurance, coz you’ve already died…”. Great imagery and biting prose. Read more about this song and ‘Like Janis’.

To Whom It May Concern (1979 live version)

A wonderful, almost progressive rock version with jazz-blues flute and even a bass solo. Recorded in Australia in 1979. This track is over 8 minutes long and the band is introduced on this song.
Really great version.

Heikki’s Suburbia Bus Tour

After a conversation with my father, I wanted to share a short story…

In the sixties, there were these people called hippies. It can be said that a long hair, dark skin, free thinking musician, like Rodriguez could have been labelled one. In my youth, I recall hearing about how the “rich folks” (those living in the suburbs), would come down to the inner city of Detroit to actually see these “oddities” in their natural environment. Maybe even take a picture or two. This happened to be my neighborhood and some of my people.

Rodriguez had a very good friend named Heikki. I remember a large man with long blond/brown hair. He had a very nice home, a wife named Linda and two huge bull mastiff dogs. Despite stereotypes, Heikki was a mathematician from “Estonia” (Estonia is a republic in North-Eastern Europe, near Finland) who rode a classic motorcycle. In fact, one of the places that Rodriguez played, a “motorcycle funeral”, was for one of Heikki’s friends. The motorcycle club was called “The Penetrators”.

Anyway, someone had made fun of Rodriguez’s friend. Protective of Heikki’s feelings, Rodriguez organized what I consider to be a peaceful form of retaliation. A bus was chartered, full of hippies, four gallons of wine, etc. The group went to Grosse Point, Michigan and surrounding areas where they visited suburbian malls and neighborhoods on a tour of their own. The rest, is in the music. The story made the newspapers in Detroit and also reached Florida (a southern U.S. state).
– Eva Rodriguez, 1997

A Most Disgusting Song

In “A Most Disgusting Song” the people are like someone we all know. I think it was a depiction of a place Rodriguez played, a bar called “The Sewer” near the Detroit River, that was demolished a long time ago (In the song “Cause” Rodriguez speaks to Jesus (his brother?) at the Sewer). One of the places that Rodriguez played, a “motorcycle funeral”, was for one of Heikki’s friends. The motorcycle club was called “The Penetrators”.
– Eva Rodriguez, 1997

I’ll Slip Away by Rod Riguez in 1967

Originally appeared on SugarMan.org

  • I’ll Slip Away / You’d Like To Admit It (Impact 1031) August 1967 (USA)

Cash Box, September 23, 1967 Rod Riguez could make a name for himself with this bluesy, mid-tempo rock ballad. Keep it in sight. Flip: “You’d Like To Admit It”.

These 2 songs were released as a single in 1967 and credited to Rod Riguez. The lyrics for ‘You’d Like To Admit It’ were transcribed by Glenn Coggin in January 2005.

Both songs are available as bonus tracks on the digital download release of Cold Fact by Light In The Attic Records.

The 1967 version of I’ll Slip Away was released on The Best Of Impact Records CD (Collectables COL-5883) in November 1997. Also released as a bonus track on Sugar Man: The Best Of Rodriguez (South Africa) in September 2005.

The 1967 single features more upfront Byrds-type jangly guitar, vocal harmonies and a subdued organ in the background, when compared to the early 70’s version. The strings that are so prominent on the later version are absent on the 1967 version.

— Brian Currin

I’ll Slip Away was re-recorded in 1972/73 and released on the Australian At His Best album. It is available on the 2009 re-issue of Coming From Reality and the Searching For Sugar Man soundtrack.

Promo Single (from Discogs)

Single (from Discogs)

I’ll Slip Away: As far as the Rodriguez Impact single, “I’ll Slip Away” is concerned, I would highly suspect that both sides of that single were probably recorded at Terra Shirma Studios, since most of all of the later Impact records were recorded there. But it is possible that it may have been recorded at United Sound Studios in Detroit, since Harry Balk recorded many of his artists there as well.

The “B” side of the Impact 45, “I’ll Slip Away” is a song titled, “You’d Like To Admit It”. Both sides were produced by Harry Balk (the owner of Impact). To my knowledge, the record was only issued as a “promotional” 45, and not sold commercially to the public (see note below). The record is “near-impossible” to find, due to the fact that few copies were pressed, and Impact records went out of business shortly after the record was released. By the way, the song, “You’d Like To Admit It” was also written by Rodriguez.

I’m afraid that I can’t help you out with the lyrics to the song (read them here),”You’d Like To Admit It”, because I don’t own a copy of the single. In my many years of collecting records, I have only seen ONE copy of that record for sale, and it was much too expensive for me to buy. (IT WAS ABOUT $175.00 U.S. DOLLARS!)…

— Jerry Schollenberger, “Best of Impact Records” CD producer, May 1999
Single (from Discogs)

Read some more comments from Jerry Schollenberger

Read Tim Forster’s article about these Impact releases.

I can confirm that a regular (NOT a promo) release of Impact #1031 does exist. A speculation to the contrary exists on your Sixto R. page. Thanx for the info on this artist that you supplied; you have added to my enjoyment of record collecting, and listening.

— Steve Jones, Canada, August 2003

I’LL SLIP AWAY

And I’ll forget about the girl that said no
Then I’ll tell who I want where to go
And I’ll forget about your lies and deceit
And your attempts to be so discreet

Maybe today, yeah
I’ll slip away

And you can keep your symbols of success
Then I’ll pursue my own happiness
And you can keep your clocks and routines
Then I’ll go mend all my shattered dreams

Maybe today, yeah
I’ll slip away

Cause you’ve been down on me for too long
And for too long I just put you on
Now I’m tired of lying and I’m sick of trying
Cause I’m losing who I really am
And I’m not choosing to be like them

And if you get bored or got loneliness
Or it’s dislike for me you express
I won’t care if you’re right or you’re wrong
I won’t care cause you see I’ll be gone

Maybe today, yeah
I’ll slip away

Maybe today, yeah (I’ll slip away)
Maybe today, yeah
Maybe today, yeah
Maybe today, yeah

YOU’D LIKE TO ADMIT IT

You were the girl that laughed when I tried
You were the one that smiled when I sighed
You didn’t like my style or my songs
Now tables turned and you find you were wrong

So when I see you again I’ll just grin
Cos’ I’m glad that you had better sense than to mess up my life.

You haven’t changed and I know that you won’t
You stare at my back, then pretend that you don’t
You were too cute and correct to be mine
Now I’m kinda glad that we didn’t find time

So when I see you again I’ll just grin
And you know why it is, cos’ I’m glad that you’re his and not mine

I’m in the mood to reveal how I feel
You weren’t that sharp, but you had some appeal
Now there’s a hint of regret in your eyes
But you won’t tell me, and your smile’s your disguise

So when I see you again I’ll just grin
Cos’ I’m happy I’m here and that you’re way the heck over there!

All lyrics written by Rodriguez

Rodriguez to perform during The Cabot’s virtual 100th anniversary celebration

by Blake Maddux, Correspondent,
WickedLocal.com

Rodriguez to perform during The Cabot's virtual 100th anniversary celebration
Rodriguez to perform during The Cabot’s virtual 100th anniversary celebration

Sixto Díaz Rodriguez, the previously obscure (to Americans, at least) subject of the Oscar-winning 2012 documentary “Searching for Sugar Man,” had been scheduled to play at The Cabot this past April. In what proved to be an optimistic assessment of COVID-19’s staying power, the show was rescheduled for June.

Alas, his visit to Beverly is not among those that are now on the 2021 calendar.

That’s because the singer-songwriter – whose preternatural talent was captured on the early 1970s albums “Cold Fact” and “Coming from Reality” – has been tapped as one of many marquee performers participating in The Cabot’s 100th anniversary virtual celebration on Thursday, Dec. 3.

Though the Herald Citizen’s interview with Rodriguez was conducted by phone in February with the plan of previewing his spring concert, much of what was discussed still serves the same purpose for next week’s celebratory event.

The Detroit native described his family as “musical people who danced and sang.” Thus, Rodriguez grew up in a household of people who played music themselves rather than listening to records on a turntable. “I think they were more live,” he explained.

Mississippi-born electric blues guitarist and songwriter Jimmy Reed is the one specific artist Rodriguez names when asked about his influences. However, he tried to understand the style of “anyone playing guitar,” including folk artists who didn’t “write only boy-girl songs.”

On that latter point, Rodriguez aimed to “broaden the scope” as a lyricist when he began composing songs as a teenager.

“I’m Mexican, you know, so English is my second language,” he said.

“I have a lot respect for the English language … I play with the words,” he added, affirming his interest in how words can be manipulated and used to mean different things.

“Literature is based on experience and personal interpretation,” he also averred, indirectly describing his approach to lyric writing.

Statements like this make it unsurprising that the 78-year-old has a degree in philosophy (from Detroit’s Wayne State University, which he has long lived a few blocks from) and profoundly admires the American philosopher, psychologist, and Harvard professor William James.

“He was very optimistic,” Rodriguez said of the founder of pragmatism. “I’m optimistic. I want to live to be 350 years old. But like you, I can only do one day at a time.”

While this might be true on a personal level, Rodriguez’s lyrics are frequently far from Pollyannish with regard to societal or political concerns. For example, his 1970 song “This Is Not a Song, It’s an Outburst: or, The Establishment Blues” includes lyrics such as “Public gets irate/but forgets the vote date,” “gun sales are soaring/housewives find life boring,” and “Adultery plays the kitchen/bigot cops nonfiction.”

The recent election was nine months away when the conversation happened. As would be expected of a self-described “musico-politico” who has run for local offices in the past, Rodriguez had some thoughts on the matter.

“I’m supporting Bernie Sanders,” he shared. “I made posters for him and I carry them around.”

Asked about the then-non-lame duck Oval Office occupant, he responded, “My first line of the show is, ‘I have something to say to the commander-in-chief.’ Then I put on my hat and I shake my head down. That’s what I think of this administration.”

Expert songwriting and sage-like wisdom aside, Rodriguez is a modest and unassuming human being. That likely comes from decades of being more or less forgotten as a musician (though not everywhere, as the documentary makes abundantly clear) despite his immense talent.

Eight years of previously unexpected time in the spotlight and the economic windfall brought about by extensive touring has done nothing to change this.

“I put a roof on my house. I got new floors and new doors,” is his answer to whether he has afforded himself any indulgences. “I’m proud of the place.”

This is the same house seen in “Searching for Sugar Man,” and which a 2013 MLive article reports his having paid $50 for in 1976.

The Suitcase Show [16 June 2020] on Mixcloud includes Jane S Piddy

Piet Botha: Photo by Hein Waschefort, 2013
Piet Botha: Photo by Hein Waschefort, 2013

Every vagabond needs a suitcase.

This is a mainly South African, mostly Afrikaans series of shows with some well-known tjoons and many obscure ones.

Some happy songs, some angry songs, a few light songs, and quite a few dark ones.

“Die geraamtes in jou kas sal ewig kriewel”

The name of this show is inspired by the song “Suitcase Vol Winter” by South African Music Legend Piet Botha www.PietBotha.com

Some lyrics are explicit and/or offensive.

Photo by Hein Waschefort, 2013

The 50-Year Legacy of Sixto Rodriguez’s “Cold Fact” Is Rooted In Detroit | WDET

Rodriguez

It’s the 50-year anniversary of Sixto Rodriguez’s “Cold Fact,” co-produced with Motown Funk Brother Dennis Coffey. Although the album took off internationally, it’s still a Detroit story.

One of music’s most fascinating stories originated in Detroit, but unfolded in South Africa and Australia when audiences in those countries embraced an album largely ignored in the states.

Sixto Rodriguez, born in Detroit to Mexican immigrants, became a singer/songwriter composing protest songs that reflected the disparities in our society.

This culminated on the album “Cold Fact” released in March, 1970 — 50 years ago this month. Most recently, the Academy Award winning documentary titled “Searching for Sugarman” helped introduce “Cold Fact” to a whole new audience.

Read and listen to the full story at WDET.

50 Years Ago Today: Cold Fact | Billboard March 28, 1970

Billboard March 28, 1970
COLD FACT‘ LP in 2 page Buddah ad
Words from the city.
Hard words on a new label with a totally different trip.

Read more about this classic album, at SugarMan.org.

Cold Fact was recorded in Detroit during August & September 1969 and released in the USA on the Sussex label (catalogue number SXBS 7000) in March 1970.

Cold Fact (USA)
Cold Fact (USA, March 1970)

Cold Fact (South Africa)
Cold Fact (South Africa, 1971)

Cold Fact (USA Promo Copy)

Website Powered by WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: