Lloyd Ross – Shifty Records and other soundtracks | Jive Talking and Eyeballing

From Jive Talking and Eyeballing Facebook Group

Lloyd Ross is synonymous with Shifty Records and the Vyfster theme, for releasing albums by Sankomota, Koos Kombuis, the Kalahari Surfers, Vusi Mahlasela, Tananas and many other artists who would probably not have been recorded otherwise. Shifty Records did ground-breaking work for alternative and underground music in South Africa and much of the credit for that is due to Lloyd Ross who started the whole thing with a few other people. Time to investigate. Lloyd Ross kindly let me interview him in person in Cape Town and yes, we did keep our social distance.

Q. Hi Lloyd, I heard you went to the UK and when you came back you auditioned to play in the Radio Rats. Did it start there or before that?

A. Hey Ernesto, I am one of those guys who was always into music and like a lot of people did before the arrival of the cassette tape, sat with my record player and my guitar and learned songs by playing a section of a record over and over again until you learned the notes.I had a band in the navy with two other guys. We had the great idea of heading for their home town of East London after we got out in 1976 or 7 to turn “professional”. The band was called Horses In Transit and it lasted only a few months. In 1978 I went to the UK and where I met people who were big fans of punk and I got very much into it. I was only there for about 8 months and when I got back, while passing through Joburg, I saw the Radio Rats at the Market Cafe, run by David Marks. I really liked them. Then probably at the beginning of 1979 I read in the Sunday Times that they were looking for a guitarist. I got hold of Jonathan Handley who said: no, that was a misquote, we are not looking for another person to join the band. I told him that I was going to come for an audition anyway. I took my Fender Strat and hitched up to Joburg, spending my 21st birthday in a school bicycle shed in some godforsaken Free State town. So anyway, I got up to Joburg, to their practice room in Springs, which they shared with Corporal Punishment, did the audition and the band said Ja, you are in. Then I sort of fell over for a month, because I’d picked up some kinda weird ear infection in that bicycle shed. Every time I stood up, I hurled. I went back to Cape Town, convalesced, got my things in order, went back to Joburg and played with them until they broke-up for the first time which was the end of 1979.

Q. Did you do any recordings with the Radio Rats?

A. Yes, I played on Rocket Road… 

Rocket Road: that was me on guitar, Dave Davies (vocals), Jonathan (guitar & vocals), Herbie Parkin (bass), and a guy called Pierre de Vos on drums who I see played with Tim Parr as well. He was the drummer for Baxtop at one stage. Of course, Jonathan called the drummer Pierre de Sade, as he does, ha, ha.

Q. You returned to Cape Town after that and then co-formed the Happy Ships?

A. I arrived back in Cape Town and got a job in a pizza den and got various bands together. I was in a band called Rubbish which was kinda punky but more new wave. Energetic music. A three piece with a guy called Wayne Raath on drums and Mark van Niekerk on bass. I then met Warrick Swinney (Sony) who had been playing with Guillaume Rossouw in the Rude Dementals and put the Happy Ships together. That was Wayne Raath again, Warrick, myself, a guy called Phillip Nangle and Hamish Davidson who now meditates for world peace in the Rocky Mountains. Hamish is a Transcendental Meditationist. Their philosophy is if you get 1% of the world’s population to meditate, it will change the world. They pay for people to meditate and he is one of those guys… and he was on sax. The Happy Ships was a wacky stream of unconsciousness sorta band. A lot of fun to play with. Everyone played everything, except for Hamish, who played sax…and meditated. Oh, and we had another occasional member in Jonathan Partridge, who played the pocket. 

Q. You said you made some good contacts in Joburg?

A. When I was playing with the Radio Rats I met a lot of musicians and in particularly Ivan Kadey. He was playing in a band called National Wake…

The way we met is, I was looking for a place to stay while playing with the Rats. I was walking through the dilapidating Randlord district of Parktown & it was evening and I heard the unmistakable sound of a Fender Stratocaster emanating from a rambling rundown randlordish house. I went up and knocked at the door. I introduced myself and said: nice riff, and asked if he knew of a place to stay. I ended up staying there for the time I was in Joburg. Occasionally National Wake would be staying there too, the whole band; the Khoza brother Punka and Gary, One Eyed Mike, etc. Ivan and I started planning the studio then, the idea of it at least…Was this the beginning of Shifty Records?

A. Not really. It took a while for us to get it together. It was only when I got back to Johannesburg to work in the film industry that we got together again.

Q. So it was you and Ivan that started Shifty Records?

A. Yes. I bought my gear with the money made in the film industry. Ivan and I bought different stuff. Ivan bought a mixing desk and some microphones. I bought the tape machine, some outboard gear, cables and that kind of thing. It was an Otari 8-track machine. The first affordable 8-track machine actually because it was a half-inch and before that, multi tracking was an expensive affair on 2 inch machines, completely unaffordable for people in our position. We came in at the right time to do independent recordings where you did not need to mortgage your house, not that we had one, to do recordings.

Q. So that was how Shifty Records was born?

A. We had the studio but where to put it? Ivan was in an apartment on Rockey Street and I was kinda footloose, so we bought a caravan! But what to call the enterprise? A caravan meant we had a mobile studio, so we though of words indicating moving and eventually came up with the name Shifty. Funnily enough we did not record our own music at that stage. I was bandless, and so was Ivan. This was 1983 and Ivan didn’t get much time off from his architectural duties. Even though he helped set it up he was unable to participate in the dream of recording, but he was always there in spirit.

Q. The first release was Sankomota?

A. Indeed. I went down and recorded Sankomota later in 1983, it was our first album release. On a shoot in Lesotho I had seen this band playing at the Holiday Inn and they were really lovely. Spoke to them afterward and asked them to send me a tape. They told me they were banned in South Africa because they had done a tour under the name Uhuru, meaning freedom (not such a good idea for a band in South Africa at the time) and the lead singer was called Black Jesus (an even less good idea) who made political comments on stage so…NO! I thought, we have a mobile studio, we will come to you. I drove down with Warrick Sony and recorded the album in a couple of days. I took the recordings back to Joburg and did some post-production and Warrick added some Tabla and we added some sax from Rick van Heerden and trumpet by Stompie Monana. It was a good album to start with considering where we ended up going… And this is Sankomoto… 

Q. Then on to the Happy ships was it?

A.Jip, came down to Cape Town, and recorded in Robin Hawkins garage in Wynberg. He very kindly let us use the space. At that stage, Hamish (Davidson) was already meditating 4 hours a day so we would have to take long breaks.

Q. So when did Warrick (Sony) join you? Was it is the Happy Ships?

A. No, Warrick was still living in Cape Town. I think he was at UCT (University) in 1983 when we did the recording. I had gone to Joburg in 1981 and that is when the studio started coming together. You mentioned you thought the Vyfster theme funded Shifty but seeing as I recorded that on the equipment that I bought with Ivan, it was there before the movie score. That was a money-making exercise, my day job, so to speakThis is the haunting Vyfster theme from the legendary SABCTV series Vyfster…. 

…Going back to ’79 when I was cooking up this thing with Ivan, the energy of Corporal Punishment featuring James Phillips and Carl Raubenheimer’s creative coming together was very inspirational for me. I viewed it as an indictment on the industry that these guys were not hunted down and recorded. I mean the humour, the melodies, the energy. So that’s why I wanted to record music actually. We did eventually record some Corporal Punishment but that was after their early tour de force in the 70’s. When the studio was going, James came up from Grahamstown where he was doing a BMus and we put down a couple of numbers. Then he and Carl did that Illegal Gathering project in Cape Town on a 4 track cassette which I still think is such great work. I mean fidelity wise it’s crap, but the capturing of the moment was superb. A bit like shooting a documentary with a kak, shaky camera, but what is happening in the frame is an amazing or beautiful sequence. You feel the energy of it and never worry about the technology. The important thing is what is being put down not how it is being put down. 

Q. What was next for Shifty?

A. We did Bernoldus (Wie Is Bernoldus Niemand LP), we did a couple of albums on that 8-track. We did Bernoldus, we did Sankomota, we did the Corporals recordings, the Own Affairs by Kalahari Surfers. Warrick probably recorded that on 8-track as well. I was not involved in that though. Warrick did his own thing and in fact, we very seldom collaborated, hardly at all. But we used to see each other every day which was great. If you want a fresh take every day, Warrick is the guy. Very tangential sense of humour. What was said the day before was not repeated the day after. Everything was gouged in intelligence and fun so it was always great to have him around… 

Q. Carry on, please..

A. Just trying to think….. the first Mzwakhe album, it was later actually. Look, around that time Warrick came up to Joburg and we replaced the 8-track with a Fostex 16-track which Warrick bought. I had become aware that there wasn’t just this new wave thing happening, but there was this really broad spectrum of quality music from all sectors of society that needed to be recorded. The reason why it wasn’t being recorded by the industry is because it was not considered “commercial”, or was political. This meant it would never get played on the radio, which in turn meant it would be difficult to sell. So unlike pretty much the whole of the industry, apart from perhaps Mountain Records in Cape Town, we recorded music because we considered it worth recording for aesthetic, rather than commercial reasons.

Q. You mean like those worker choir groups?

A. Ja, who would record that in South Africa? Maybe a Hugh Tracy if he had still been around. That goes for a lot of Shifty albums, nobody would have recorded them.

Q. How did you record those worker choirs?

A. That I did with Brian Tilley who ran this thing called Video News Services.. Brian and I traveled around the Transvaal and Natal recording those choirs because it was exciting and we thought it was the right thing to do. That is how we did things, that’s how I still do things, generally speaking, and with my film making a lot of the time.

Q. So there were a lot of different choirs?

A. Sure, we went to the East Rand. West Rand, Britz near Pretoria and then we went down to Durban. Unfortunately, we didn’t film. It would have been fucking great if we had filmed. We recorded people in the midlands, at Mooi River, Durban, the hostels, all over the place. It was really lekker. And it was FOSATU, it was pre-Cosatu days so ja, that was quite an early album as well… This is the DTMB choir.. 

Q. What was next for Shifty?

A. Next was the Mzwakhe album,. I saw him perform at a leftie thing in Yeoville where I think Johnny Clegg was also playing. He was a poet and he had a lot of charisma and attitude and I thought it could be powerful with some musical backing. I got Ian Herman, Gito Baloi and Simba Morri to workshop the music with him, so that was very exciting. Just get in the studio with musicians that are good at what they do and just lay it down. 

Q. How did you hook up with Jennifer Ferguson? Did you see her at the Market Theatre?

A. I probably knew her personally before I heard her play. Her boyfriend Christo Leach was a director of film and theatre and she was acting as a ghost in some weird TV drama. I met her then. She may have told me she played, but then she was doing quite a lot of cabaret stuff in Hillbrow. For me, it has always been about the songs and she was a great songwriter. Also, her headspace, in terms of where we were, politically, you know. It became pretty obvious that we should record her. She always pretty much knew what she wanted, so with her stuff I didn’t do very much production. In fact, generally I tried to be as much removed as possible and let the people get their own stuff together and just contribute on the technical side and arrangements. Although, I’m sure there are those that would dispute that, ha ha! This is Jennifer from her first album… 

The second album, which was done years later… she did on her own. It wasn’t recorded with Shifty, it was done at Video lab I think and then we released it.

Q. OK, now for Koos Kombuis, aka Andre Le Toit. He sent you a demo?

A. I really loved the vibe of the demo so I wanted to replicate it with better quality audio. I invited him up to Joburg. I had a PCM machine, an early digital stereo machine that recorded onto Betamax tape. These tapes are like three hours long. So I set him up in the studio and I hit record and I went out. I said just try to do what you did on the demo. I am not going to be here. Imagine it is your own space and do your own thing and I went shopping or something. In those days the studio was in Rand Mines properties, way out near Nazrec on Baragwanath Road. When I came back he was just finishing off. He had been alone for two hours playing. I had also asked him to do the intros, like he had on the demo and I just edited what he had done. I then compared those intros to the ones the original demo cassette and chose the ones with the better vibe.

An interesting aside is that we are actually about to release that original cassette demo. Technically I cleaned it up quite a bit. I then sent it to Koos to see what he thought of the idea. He was initially a little worried about it, but he’s come around to liking the idea.

Q. Why is Koos worried?

A. It wasn’t so much the fact that he had bronchitis, which comes through as coughs and sniffles on the demo, but rather because of some references to girlfriends from back in the day. He had changed names for the studio recordings to avoid hassles. The one has become a lawyer and he doesn’t want to cause shit. I have bleeped those, so he’s okayed it. There are a couple of songs that aren’t on the original. I’ve always loved that tape and I think his fans will do likewise. It is called Voedselvergifting. Though that was one of the few demos I responded to positively, I think I pretty much answered everybody that sent me a demo. And there were lots. Still have them in the archive.

Q. Kerkorrel? How did you get to record him?

A. Ralph Rabie (Kerkorrel) was sent down by Beeld or the Rapport to interview Koos/Andre and they liked each other. Ralph said that he also plays and played him some of his stuff, to which Koos said, well, you are a much better musician than me. I should be interviewing you. When Koos came up to Joburg they got together and the rest is history. The original Gereformeerde Blues Band, Koos was in it but that was for like one or two gigs. He was not a team player.This is Die Gereformeerde Blues Band… 

Q. Simba Morri, was he a Shifty artist and was that after the Mapantsula band he was in?

A. Yes, we first recorded Simba as part of Mapantsula for the End Conscription Campaign album and shortly thereafter on his solo Wasamata, with Gito Baloi and Ian Herman backing him up and Jannie Hanepoot arranging the brass. He makes such gentle music, just like the man himself?This is Simba Morri with the album released by Shifty. https://simbamorri.bandcamp.com/album/wasamata

Simba has had some serious health issues earlier this year and had to be admitted to the hospital for treatment. He is home now but I am not sure what the prognosis is so please help the guy out by ordering his albums on Bandcamp.Shifty Records 3 July 2020: ‘Live – Simba Morri’ is out now exclusively on Bandcamp at https://simbamorri.bandcamp.com/album/live … all funds raised will go towards the Simba Morri medical assistance fund (first Friday of the month is a good day to purchase it as Bandcamp takes no percentage of sales on that day… Go get it and share, share, share 🙂 Thank You!

Q. What other Shifty shifty artists didn’t we touch on?

A. Oh, there are a lot, ha, ha, ha, ha.

Q. Roger Lucey?

A. Ja I recorded his After the Thunder concerts way back, but we never did a proper release with Roger, just a single with his alter ego Tighthead Fourie and the Lose Forwards, which is really a hoot!…

Q. The Genuines, how did that recording happen?

A. I was working with Ian Herman from the very early days, probably even before our first Shifty album when I recorded that Roger Lucey concert and Ian was playing drums. He was like nineteen or something, he was living at Crown Mines, maybe at the back of Roger’s place even, and as soon as I heard him play I wanted to use him on every recording that needed a drummer. He probably ended up playing on 50% of the Shifty repertoire. The Genuines must have come along in 1986/87, the rest of the guys were from Cape Town and Ian hooked up with them. As soon as I heard the Genuines I wanted to record them. It was crazy that I didn’t have to fight the rest of the industry off for them, but that’s just how the SA industry was back then. Probably still it. An incredibly technically proficient band with charisma and a helluva vibe. First we recorded the rock album. This was the single from the Genuines album Goema released in 1987… 

Even more fantastic album was Mr. Mac and the Genuines, which was the goema album, not the album called Goema, but the album using the goema tradition. I love the very tight sound of that recording. At that stage, I was using a lot of reverb on everything which is really embarrassing for me now, you know? But that album I produced really tight and the energy that comes through is amazing. That’s what you look for as a producer, you know- which is to manifest the immediate energy of people playing together to be heard for eternity. Not always an easy thing. Robby Jansen and Tony Cedras provided the brass. And here is that groundbreaking album in full…

Q. Tananas was another great Shifty band. Can you tell us about them, please?

A. This is Tananas featuring Ian Herman, the late, great Gito Baloi and the enigmatic Steve Newman… https://tananas.bandcamp.com/album/tananas Ian was living at the studio at that time, that was the second place we occupied at Rand Mine Properties. In the former, we were in a single-story building where we rented rooms from someone called Jackie Quinn who was involved in the ANC. We didn’t know that at the time and she had connections with people in Lesotho. It was after she had moved out of the house she got taken out by the South African military in Lesotho. There was a picture of her lying in the morgue on the front page of the Sunday Times. I could not believe it. The SA press had never published a picture like that before. It was shocking to me, not only because I knew the person, but because of the blatant disrespect that the publishing of the image represented. That was the first house and then there was the mine doctor’s house across the valley that we moved into a few years later. There were only two houses there in this wide open veld near Uncle Charlies. Warrick was also staying at the house. It was just music, that is all it was about and I remember recording the Genuines, both albums there. By the time of the second house, the caravan was no more. Of course, when the caravan was around I did other recordings not yet mentioned, like The Cherry Faced Lurchers Live At Jamesons in 1985. Pulled the caravan outside of Jamesons and ran a cable in and straight on to 2-track. There was no multitrack, no mixing afterward. 2 nights recording, wonderful … 

I also took the caravan down to Swaziland in 1985 and recorded a band called Impandzi which was never a Shifty release and then we went to Botswana as well and recorded the Kgwanyape Band. It was like a Tswana-Celtic sound, a beautiful mixture. There were some ex-pats playing in the band, the guitarist was from Germany, Mandolin player from England, a flutist from Australia and the rest of the guys were Tswana.Here is that beautiful album. 

Q. OK so Gary, Herselmann, The Kêrels, we have to talk about them…

A. They were playing around Jamesons where a lot of the Shifty A&R was done. I loved The Kêrels, like just about everyone else who saw them. Gary’s personality just shone through the music. You know Gary, he has always got a take on things that transports you from the serious, put it that way. The eternal binger. I think that Jannie (Hannepoort van Tonder of the Gereformeerde Blues Band) has a fantastic description of him: he is the kind of guy that would be jolling for 3 days with no sleep and still be the sharpest, funniest brain in the room. Koos describes him turning into a dog for the Voëlvry Tour, which he did for the whole tour! He would sit under the table and snap at people’s ankles as they passed by. But anyway, this is the first Kêrels album released by Shifty, Ek Sê.. 

Q. The Radio Rats Big Beat album because I think that was one of the best releases on Shifty. Was that an enjoyable album to make?

A. We did Titus Groan before that, a single called Agony.. https://sjambokmusic.com/2014/10/13/titus-groan/

It was interesting for me to do that. The Radio Rats were the first proper band that I played in so to revisit them almost ten years later was kinda interesting. The songs were maybe not quite as in the box as their debut Into the Night We Slide but there were some really great songs there. Which was my favourite now? Pesthouse… 

Q. The live Shifty releases and there were some really good ones…

A. The Jameson’s thing of course (Cherry Faced Lurchers Live At Jamesons).. 

Winston’s Jive Mix Up, I think that album is great but it has never been properly released. That is one we must do on vinyl I think… 

Q. There were a few really good compilation albums that featured some artists who did not do full albums with Shifty like Nude Red.. Can you tell us about those?

A. We did 2 compilations back then. There was A Naartjie in our Sosatie and then Forces Favourites and those were quite early albums. Naartjie was probably number 5, around 1985. That had Bernoldus on it and this guy called Timothy that just arrived on our doorstep fresh up from Transkei. I don’t know how the hell he found us. Very sweet guy, he couldn’t play an instrument, but he sang us some stuff and we really liked it. We composed a backing, recorded him and then he disappeared again… He’s on that album but we didn’t even get to know his surname… 

Q. there was also this guy Stan James on there wasn’t there?

A.Stan, yes, a very good friend of Roger Lucey and in-fact he performed at Roger’s After The Thunder concert. Both Rogers recording and Stan’s recording on A Naartjie In Our Sosatie are from that concert…Here is Roger..

and this is Stan.. 

Q. So what are you working on now?

A. It is as you find the time. None of these things are going to make anyone any money. It just happens to be lockdown now so I found a little time to remix The Other White Album (James Phillips). I’ve got the brains trust in – everyone involved that was still around to criticism the mixes. I am also using Willem Moller’s ears as a second opinion. That is going to come out this year to mark 25 years since James’ passing. On the 31st July, on the anniversary of his death we put out a compilation album of the people that performed at the Concert For James. I put the video of the show up recently as part of the Shifty Lockdown Viral Picture Show… 

If you go to the Shifty site and go to the Lockdown Festival you will find that almost all the movies are still there… https://shifty.co.za/records/documentaries/

Shifty September, that was a roaring success. what did that mean for you?

A. Hmmm, You came up for it especially, didn’t you?

Me: Ja, I couldn’t miss that…

A. That was such a roller coaster ride for me, hey! Jean Bourdin from Alliance Française approached me to use Shifty to celebrate 20 years of democracy in South. Now, that is a compliment. It was only supposed to be one or two events at the Alliance but it just started snowballing in my head. So eventually we had six events at Alliance, plus the big concert, so it became six months of work. I went through all the archives, videos, all the memories came flooding back. Jean was amazing, you might mention him in this. He is one of those enablers of culture in the most subtle way. He was however there for you every time you needed him, you know, organising the events, trying to find funding, whatever. The Alliance’s are really a language school. That is what they do, but part of their mandate is to promote culture, but Jean was so into music that he always walked the extra mile. He is back in France now, but it is his biggest dream is to open up a jazz club in Joburg because he loves the country and the music so much. As anyone will know, this is not a good idea, but it is a fine dream. Ja, so he was a great help and that is also where Bill (Botes) got involved, another amazing guy. Just does it for the love of it. Tried to pay him, tried to get him to take money from ticket sales, he refused. he spent months on that. He is driven by the love of the music and he makes things happen. It’s nice to have people like that around. and it is a great compliment to a guy like me who is recording the stuff. I really don’t like the act of trying to sell it. Bill loves that shit. Where was he in the heydays of Shifty! Would have been amazing to have had him around.

And then we got to a stage when things started to change. The Robben Island prisoners were released and Mandela was released and we had just recorded Vusi. The CEO of the newly formed BMG Africa was incredibly keen on Vusi and I surmise that he did a joint venture with Shifty just to get Vusi. There were a couple of records that were recorded in that period: Sunny Skies with James (Phillips), Zen Surfing with Robin Auld. I think Matthew van der Want and Urban Creep as well, though maybe I’m wrong about that. That was probably with Tic Tic Bang. Confused. Van der Want/Letcher was after that, brillianT!…

We were only with them for 3 years because it was a fuck up. Their sales staff were not interested in what we were doing so we would make the records and then nothing would happen. It was almost worse than before when we had little idea of what we were doing in terms of trying to sell things, but by that stage, I had had it. There were just too many repeats of these really incredibly talented young people coming through my doors with nowhere to go. Towards the end of the ’80’s, I knew there was no hope for them in terms of a career in SA, so what do you say to them? Stop recording, stop playing, no, you can’t say that. The only thing you can say is: “Go overseas”. It almost felt as though I was facilitating an illusion, you know what I mean? I was incredibly excited about the music, the people around Shifty were incredibly excited about the music, we knew we had done good albums, but often with just one venue in Joburg, sometimes a venue in Durban and maybe one or two in Cape Town, that was it. No radio play because the music was too interesting for radio. And then absolutely no other infrastructure in terms of management, etc. So after you have been doing that for 12 years…

Q. Neil Johnston on Radio 5 was a great help wasn’t he?

A. Ja, Neil was great, Benjie was always very supportive of what we did and journalists were always very supportive – you know Gus Silber and Richard Haslop, all those guys. We only got radio play every now and then. Tim Modese was a DJ at Bop radio and he broke Sankomoto for us. Richard Prior said he wore out 3 albums playing Sankomota over and over again. Sankomoto was always an evergreen for us. Never huge sales, but it always sold every month, timeless, you know… So by the mid-’90s, by the new dispensation, I was ready to move on……You can find the parts of the Shifty catalogue on most online platforms, but Bandcamp has all of it: https://shiftyrecords.bandcamp.com/

Also check out the Shifty website: https://shifty.co.za/

On behalf of all the artists recorded by Shifty Records, I would just like to thank Lloyd for all his incredible work and for all the albums that would not otherwise have been heard. Shifty Records is a very important part of South African Music and Lloyd Ross and Ivan Kadey can feel very proud. Cheers Lloyd and thank you for the incredible music.

Ernesto Garcia Marques 12/08/2020

Carl Raubenheimer – Illegal Gatherings and Corporal Punishment | Jive Talking and Eyeballing

From Jive Talking and Eyeballing Facebook Group


Q. Howzit Carl, It is an honour for me to be able to help tell your story because as far as I know it never has. Did you start playing in Springs and carry on in Grahamstown or the other way round?
A. My first band was in Springs, but don’t ask me now what it was called. All I know was that we wrote our own songs. Pretty much a jam band. We used an old gramophone as an amp. It’s main claim to fame was that we invented a weird kind of guitar synthesiser by putting the record needle on the bass string of a guitar that I’d swapped my bicycle for. The feedback we extracted from that old gramophone was unbelievable. I think that’s where my love for Psychedelia came from. But it’s also probably the single reason we never made it out of the garage. You couldn’t lug a gramophone around to a gig. If anybody out there wants to try doing the same thing with the record needle I promise the sound will blow you away.


Q. Can you tell us about your first band – Amazing Head – which featured Bill Knight in Grahamstown? Bill also mentioned the punk bands, Broederband and later Head Office. Were these just varsity bands gigging around Grahamstown or did you play anywhere else?
A. In Grahamstown Bill and I started Amazing Head. We mainly played at the folk club but had a couple of gigs in and around Grahamstown and one in Port Alfred at a dance type thing. Went down like a lead balloon. It was a band with a revolving line up. Sometimes just two or three of us but once when we were playing at the great hall our numbers leapt up to about eight or nine of us. The only reason we played in the great hall was because Colin Shamley or some much bigger act ran out of petrol on the way down to Grahamstown and we were offered a chance to play. As soon as the organisers heard our first song they leapt into action and spent the next half an hour trying to get us off the stage. But we were having none of it and played our whole set. After that we weren’t even allowed to play at the folk club!


Q. And then you had something called “Carl Mark’s”?
A. Well. In between Rhodes and the rest of my life there was a period back in Springs when there was nothing do but wait for Godot so Mark Bennett and I got this little folk duo called Carl Mark’s together. One of us had organised a local folk club which had meetings in the East Geduld Recreation club. Musicians like Jonathan Handley, Dave Ledbetter, James Phillips and us played there.
I’d heard about this music competition in Klerksdorp. First prize was a recording contract which in those days we thought was quite a good idea. So we decided to get into my little blue beetle and off we went. We played a pretty decent set as far as I remember but we came nowhere. The winner was this old ballie on a bek fluitjie. We couldn’t believe it. Maybe it had something to do with the fact that the kompetisie was organised by the Afrikaans Taalkunde Vereeniging. And with a name like Carl Mark’s…. Well.

Q. So did Corporal Punishment emerge from Carl Mark’s?
A. Sort of. Jonathan Handley from the Rats had moved into my suburb and although he was from Welkom he was by far the coolest person we’d met in Springs. He was also writing his own songs and was busy getting the Radio Rats together. It was only natural that we’d set up a loose collaboration of musicians even though we weren’t in the same band. We knew after hearing his stuff and jamming in the back yard of his house that that was the way our music should move. Mark and I soon realised that what we actually wanted was an electric band with loud amps and a drummer etc.

Q. So how did Corporal Punishment come about?
A. Well after Rhodes university I had the small matter of conscription to contend with. I had never had any intention of going to the Army. There was a Dutch organisation called “Omkeer” which I’d contacted. They facilitated South African conscientious objectors get refugee status in the Netherlands. The only problem was that I had to get there to apply. And there was no way I had that kind of money. I decided to pretend to be insane and managed to inveigle my way into the embrace of military psychiatry. Ward 22 at 2 mil hospital. While I was there I slipped over the fence to the entertainment unit for an interview and lo and behold they accepted me. So there I was. In the first six months of military service. Not my ideal, but better than infantry. At the same time my old pal James Phillips was in the last six months of his stint. I had organised a flat in Pretoria and James used to come around every night and we started jamming and writing songs together. That was the beginning of Corporal Punishment

Q. That was 1978, the disco era. You started off quite funky in the beginning but then you became more alternative. Did the Radio Rats have any influence on you?
A. Yes very much so. But other things also influenced us. Even though we started off in the Disco era, it was also just two years after the ’76 Soweto uprising. We’d been conscientised. There was more than just one agenda in our world.

Q. The first time I heard Corporal Punishment was with the 2 songs you had on the Six Of the Best compilation album released by Benjy Mudie’s WEA Records. Did Benjy approach you to submit tracks or how did that come together?
You recorded 2 songs for that album, Victim’s Victim and the brilliant Raubenheimer penned; Goddess of Depression. Can you tell us about the latter, which for me is one of the greatest South African songs of all time?
Here is Goddess:


A. Well thank you. I think Victim’s Victim is utter rubbish. Something I’m ashamed to admit I wrote. But you’re right “Goddess” is fantastic. Not just because it’s my song but the Corporals gave it such an amazing feel. Much later after Corporal Punishment had disbanded we had a brief revival and played a couple of gigs in Joburg and Lloyd Ross allowed us access to his Shifty mobile studio which was a caravan parked outside the garage where we were rehearsing. We re-recorded some of our songs and “Goddess” was one of them. Even better the second time round. All those songs eventually ended up on the cassette release “The Voice of Nooit” Get it if you can!

Q. Corporal Punishment seem to split between heavy political commentary about the injustices of Apartheid like on Darkie and Brain Damage. Do you think you were a political band or just commenting on the times and your working class background?
This is Brain Damage…


A. Of course we were political. The country was completely fucked up. We were involved in an indefensible war. Racism had seduced all the whities into believing that we would always be able to get jobs, we would always have money, our lives would always be safe. All we had to do was look the other way. All of us! The Corporals couldn’t ignore what was going on. But at the same time James and I were in the army, Mark Bennett had a nicely paid job. So what to do. We sang heavy songs about the shit that was going on. I changed my name so that “Sersant Majoor de Koker” wouldn’t find out about my “other” life. In interviews we said that we were just “ordinary okes”. We hoped that the other “ordinary okes” would also start putting up their “ordinary” hands and things could maybe start changing!
Jonathan Handley of the Radio Rats said of you, “…the Corporals were completely fucking unacceptable. They smoked dope and were very political”.

Q. Your comment to that? Time to call in the exterminators?
A. Yes

Q. The band released a four song EP: Fridays and Saturdays?
A. At the time the Rats had secured a recording contract and Greg Cutler, their record producer, had organised a demo recording session at SATBEL studios so that he could familiarise himself with their songs. But Jonathan was our chom and he gave us four hours of their studio time. The Corporals pulled in sober and we recorded 4 songs which ended up on that EP. I then took the EP around to all the record companies, again looking for that idiotic thing, “The Recording Contract”.
I think “spat out” would be a good phrase.
Corporal Punishment broke up in 1980. James Phillips went to university in Grahamstown and Carl Raubenheimer moved to Cape Town. But Carl and James were to be reunited again in another band called “The Illegal Gathering”.
The Illegal Gathering were Carl Raubenheimer (guitar/vocals), James Phillips (guitar and vocals), Wayne Raath (drums) and another Springs alumni, David Ledbetter (bass/guitar & vocals). Legend states that the band spent 6 weeks in the Cape Town summer of 1982 writing most of their songs, rehearsing them, playing live and then recording them (onto a 4 track cassette machine). The songs produced by The Illegal Gathering composed half of the tracks on The Voice Of Nooit, a cassette released by Shifty Records in 1986 which also featured Corporal Punishment.
The title, “The Voice of Nooit” was adapted from a poem by James Phillips which was featured in Jonathan Handley’s Palladium fanzine – “This is the Voice Of Nooit”… https://illegalgathering.bandcamp.com/releases

Q. Did you ever try to get this released on vinyl because it would have made an awesome split LP?
A. Nope. By this time I’d had it with the record industry. But I am so proud of this little adventure. We infiltrated the Broadway building in the Foreshore. My friend Piet Maree had found this abandoned studio one floor below the American embassy. Already there was the biggest mixing desk I’d ever seen. All we had to do was bring in the Portastudio, the wine and the zol. We also brought in some blankets to dampen the audio in various areas of the studio. We took it seriously. So did the embassy staff who thought we were moving in. Their first cadenza was when James took to stomping through the corridors with his size 12 bare feet recording sound effects. The thing is that the music was absolutely beautiful in its own dissolute way. Three songs were used in the movie “The Bang Bang Club”.

Q. In 1984 you released a brilliant and very controversial compilation LP called “Out Of the Blue”. The LP featured an all Cape Town line-up of bands with songs by The Quarter Zones, Tony Wood, Wunderbah, Carl Helgard (Raubenheimer himself), Under 2 Flags, The Outfitters, Bionic Automaton and The Illegal Gathering. Can you tell us how you came to put this album together? Did you do it in conjunction with Chris Quirke who had his Observatory productions tape distribution? No album or subsequent release captures the excitement and buzz of Cape Town music in the mid-80’s as this release does and it should really be rereleased on vinyl or failing that on CD. Go for it Carl.
I will help…
A. The thing about that record is that it had a few different silk screened covers so that, apart from the music, if you come across it, and you’ve got one signed by David Rosen, you’re in luck. This is the same David Rosen who went on to become a leading designer in the New York fashion scene so I’d imagine it might even have some value attached to it. Chris and I were both into that Indie thing so his Obs Prods and my Skate productions although similar in intent weren’t part of the same stable. But you’re right. There was some amazing music on that record. I’ve still got a couple but sorry for you. I’m not letting them go.

Q. Carl’s next band caused quite a stir in the live Cape Town scene but alas I never did see Teenage Botha live. It featured Joelle Chesselet, mother of Alice Phoebie Lou. The band played many drunken gigs at the Base, Club Indaba and what else can you say about that band Carl?
A. Not so much of the drunken… This was the biggest band I ever played in. At one stage I think there were maybe 14 members in it. The guys were all attracted there by the presence of three extremely talented and dare I say it, beautiful female musicians. What can I say? One by one the guys left until only the musicians who were interested in the songs remained. Teenage Botha wasn’t a bad band by a long chalk but we were playing in an era of uncoolness. The cultural boycott meant that we all had to be embarrassed to be alive. Even now I find it hard to make that kind of statement. Forgive me Steve.

Q. The next band Carl Formed was “Shake Baby” The band managed to get 2 songs on the In from the Cold album. I believe you were not too thrilled at being on an album with all the other, mostly gothic bands….
Here is In from the Cold featuring 2 tracks by Carls Shake Baby band from 1988….


A. Well if you listen to that record you’ll notice that we sound like wedding gatecrashers who refused to dance on broken glass. It wasn’t worth the trouble.

Q. Moving to Cape Town in 1988 I went to go and see Carl’s next band The Beat Poets many times. The bands saxophonist Vernon Matzopoulos ran the Cafe Royal club in Church Street Cape Town and for a few years it was the mecca of the live music scene. Every Friday and Saturday the Cafe Royal used to put on gigs by all the best local bands of the time including, Bill Knight, Koos Kombuis, Valiant Swart, Artvark, the Beat poets themselves, Piet Retief and the Great Trek and many other cool bands. Those were incredible days hey Carl, most definitely a highlight of my jolling days. Can you recall any special moments there? When and why did it close?
A. My abiding memory of that club was when I gave up smoking and I used to go there because it was so smoky you didn’t have to put lip to filter in order to smoke. I was there every Friday and Saturday night even if we weren’t playing. Actually I have a very special memory of playing the Cafe Royal. It was December ’89 and I was getting married. Koos Kombuis had a residency at the Cafe and Gary Kerel wasn’t able to make it and I was asked to fill in for him on bass. Of course I was in like Flynn. The other musicians in Koos’s band were James Phillips, Mark Bennett and Steve Howells – all ex Corporals. So… one thing led to another and we had this secret reunion. A one off. Unfucking believable. I’ve got photo’s of Steve Howells looking so beserk that I know we also had to have been that way.
The rumours of the demise of the Cafe Royal… Well we know there was a fire and we also know there was an insurance claim but you never heard that from me.

Q. Your next outfit was called A Hundred Camels In The Courtyard?
I’d discovered an author called Paul Bowles. One of his short stories was called “A pipe of kif before breakfast gives a man the strength of a hundred camels in the courtyard” I bust that and smoked it. The band had some groovy musicians and some interesting songs but I think I was getting to the stage where it was all just getting to be a little too much.

Q. So where was your mind at that time
A. Over the years every time I resigned from a job I’d buy recording gear from my pension contributions so by this stage I had put together a pretty decent recording studio. I went to ground in there. I ended up recording literally hundreds of songs. Some of them are brilliant. Some of them are utter crap!

Q. It was a very sad day for South Africa when James Phillips died and a very sad day for you in particular as James was your mate, your old school buddy and it must have hurt so bad.
I believe you were instrumental in the organisation of the Concert for James show at the River Club in Cape Town which featured the cream of south African musicians at the time. Did you put the show together?
Not really. It was a collaborative thing. It really couldn’t go wrong. Apart from all the other musicians who’d given their time, we put together a tribute band called “The Phillipstines”. What a line up. Myself on bass, guit, vocals. Dave Ledbetter on keys, vocals, Steve Howells on drums, Hanepoot van Tonder on trombone, Buddy Wells on sax, Marcus Wyatt on trumpet, Willem Moller on Guit, Tim Parr also on guit, Aletta bezuidenhout – vocals and what was that guy’s name from Blood Sweat and Tears also on a horn of some sort. D’you know that feeling when you’re about to fall asleep and it feels like you’re bobbing in a taut spiders web. That’s what that band felt like. There are recordings of that concert but I’ve never heard them.
There was another Concert for James show in Johannesburg shortly after this. The shows were slightly different as the Radio rats played at the Jo’burg gig but not the Cape town one….
This was the Concert for James. The day the music died in south Africa and a part of it really did… https://jamesphillips.co.za/concert-for-james/
Lloyd Ross of Shifty Records put together a very moving movie for James called famous for Not being Famous.


Durban film maker Michael Cross also made a wonderful movie on James called The Fun’s Not Over and it is really, really good don’t you think Carl?


A. Michael Cross is an unbelievably talented film maker. He made two impossible to make documentaries. Firstly the Radio Rats and then the James Phillips one. Neither of those films had any kind of access to archival material and yet he still managed to make two utterly watchable movies. Well done Michael.

Q. These days Carl works as a freelance cameraman. Are you still doing that and still making music? I remember years ago you said that one day they would find you collapsed over your PC working on some new tracks.
I presume you are still composing your own music and did you write any new songs during the lockdown in South Africa? If you have any music online on Bandcamp or anywhere please share link…
A. I spent an incredibly fruitful period in the nineties and noughties recording hundreds and possibly thousands of songs. I stopped wondering long ago about what these recordings mean. What am I going to do with them. One of my biggest failings I’m told is that I don’t know when a song is finished. I keep adding to it. Just one more bit of guitar. Just a teensy little harmony. Maybe another synthesizer pad. During the time of the plague I’ve had a chance to go back to those recordings and what I’ve found hidden in that over recorded miasma are the most beautiful little echoes, the most gentle harmonics and the most hidden roarings of guitars. Me? I’m just going to mine my own trove!

Q. I have just one last question and I would appreciate it if you would give an honest answer. Where is the jol?
A. I’ve got no idea.


Thanks so much Carl, Looking forward to more bands and more releases…

Ernesto Garcia Marques 30/07/2020

Jive Talking and Eyeballing

The 100 greatest South African songs | TimesLive

From TimesLive

Abdullah Ibrahim - image: Sunday Times
Abdullah Ibrahim – image: Sunday Times

The full 100

Here they are, in chronological order, chosen by a 20-strong panel of LS writers using three criteria: 1) musical brilliance; 2) popular success; 3) impact on the national mind. Some tracks aced one category and flunked the other two, but plenty ticked all three boxes. Which immortal hits have we missed? Tune us the odds at lifestyle@sundaytimes.co.za

1. Phalafala Dolly Rathebe and the Elite Swingsters (1964)

2. Pata Pata Miriam Makeba (written in 1957 with Dorothy Masuka, but a global hit in 1967)

3. Master Jack Four Jacks And A Jill (1968)

4. Yakhal’ Inkomo Winston “Mankunku” Ngozi (1968)

5. For your Precious Love The Flames (1968)

6. The Seagull’s Name Was Nelson Des and Dawn Lindberg (1971)

7. Nomathemba Letta Mbulu (1973)

8. Mama Tembu’s Wedding Margaret Singana (1973)

9. Stimela Hugh Masekela (1974)

10. Mannenberg Abdullah Ibrahim (1974)

11. Charlie Rabbitt (1975)

12. Blues For a Hip King Abdullah Ibrahim (1975)

13. Marabi Malombo (1976)

14. Chocolate Toffee Saitana (1976)

15. Substitute Clout (1978)

16. Universal Men Juluka (1979)

17. ZX Dan The Radio Rats (1979)

18. Jo Bangles Baxtop (1979)

19. Paradise Road Joy (1980)

20. Party Harari (1981)

21. Man on the Moon Ballyhoo (1981)

22. Impi Juluka (1981)

23. The Bushman Steve Kekana (1982)

24. Isiphiwo Soul Brothers (1982)

25. Hey Boy Via Afrika (1983)

26. Shadows éVoid (1983)

27. Weekend Special Brenda Fassie (1983)

28. Shot Down The Cherry Faced Lurchers (1983)

29. See Yourself (Clowns) Ella Mental (1984)

30. Burnout Sipho “Hotstix” Mabuse (1984)

31. Is it an Ism or is it Art? Niki Daly (1984)

32. Jabulani Hotline featuring PJ Powers (1984)

33. I’m in Love with a DJ Yvonne Chaka Chaka (1985)

34. Stimela sazeZola – Mbongeni Ngema (1985)

35. Reggae Vibes is Cool Bernoldus Niemand (1985)

36. This Boy Sweatband (1986)

37. National Madness The Aeroplanes (1986)

38. Change is Pain Mzwakhe Mbuli (1986)

39. Homeless Ladysmith Black Mambazo (1986)

40. Johnny Calls the Chemist Falling Mirror (1986)

41. Now or Never Sankomota (1987)

42. Ten Ten Special African Jazz Pioneers (1987)

43. Scatterlings of Africa Johnny Clegg and Savuka (1987)

44. Weeping Bright Blue (1987)

45. Hillbrow Johannes Kerkorrel (1988)

46. Quick Quick Marcalex (1989)

47. Slave Lucky Dube (1990)

48. Shake Tananas (1990)

49. Special Star Mango Groove (1990)

50. Tomorrow Nation O’Yaba (1991)

51. I’m in Love with a Rastaman Mahlathini and the Mahotella Queens (1991)

52. Sarafina! Hugh Masekela (1992)

53. It’s About Time Boom Shaka (1993)

54. The Crossing Johnny Clegg (1993)

55. Mmalo-We Bayete (1994)

56. Never Again Prophets of Da City (1994)

57. When You Come Back Vusi Mahlasela (1994)

58. Waar Was Jy? Skeem (1994)

59. Sea Level Urban Creep (1995)

60. The Child Inside Qkumba Zoo (1995)

61. Kaffir Arthur Mafokate (1995)

62. African Dream Vicky Sampson (1996)

63. Kiss the Machine Battery 9 (1996)

64. Magasman Trompies (1997)

65. Stand in your Way Just Jinger (1997)

66. Fords Nissans Toys en Beetles Brasse vannie Kaap (1997)

67. Shibobo TKZee (1998)

68. Vul’indlela Brenda Fassie (1998)

69. Yehlisan’ Umoya Busi Mhlongo (1998)

70. Sondela Ringo Madlingozi (1999)

71. Thathi Sgubu Bongo Maffin (1999)

72. Blue Eyes Springbok Nude Girls (1999)

73. Genes & Spirits Moses Molelekwa (2000)

74. Born in a Taxi Blk Sonshine (2000)

75. Nkalakatha Mandoza (2000)

76. Afrikaners is Plesierig Karen Zoid (2001)

77. Meisie Meisie Kurt Darren (2001)

78. Ghetto Fabulous Zola & Kaybee (2002)

79. Ndihamba Nawe Mafikizolo (2002)

80. Ayelekile Amasango Ismael (2002)

81. Picture Perfect Perez (2002)

82. Midnight 340ml (2003)

83. Umoya Skwatta Kamp (2003)

84. Nomvula (After the Rain) Freshlyground 2003

85. Destiny Malaika (2004)

86. Nizalwa Ngobani Thandiswa Mazwai (2004)

87. Matofotofo Pitch Black Afro (2004)

88. Akekh’ uGogo Mzekezeke (2005)

89. Whistling in Tongues Felix Laband (2005)

90. De La Rey Bok van Blerk (2006)

91. Sister Bethina Mgarimbe (2006)

92. Feel Good Lira (2007)

93. Bantu Biko Street Simphiwe Dana (2007)

94. Show Dem (Make the Circle Bigger) JR feat Hip-Hop Pantsula (2009)

95. Cooler as Ekke Jack Parow (2010)

96. Enter the Ninja Die Antwoord (2010)

97. Fairytale Liquideep (2010)

98. Tot Die Son Uitkom Van Coke Cartel (2011)

99. Loliwe Zahara (2011)

100. Hosanna The Brother Moves on (2013)

Singing the praises of South African popular-music legends | South African Post Office Stamp Programme 2014

From South African Post Office

South African Music Legends

“Music can change the world because it can change people,”said well-know Irish singer-songwriter and musician, Bono. This is especially true in Africa, where music is an integral part of everyday life. South Africa with its melting pot of cultures has produced a rich crop of highly talented popular-music legends, whose music has changed people’s perceptions. In honour of some of these musicians, the South African Post Office will issue a set 10 self-adhesive stamps and two commemorative envelopes on 3 July, featuring artwork by Vumile Mavumengwana.

Other famous people have also sung the praises of the power of music, notably Shakespeare who wrote: “If music be the food of love, play on…”. But more applicable in the South African context, are the words of Hans Christian Andersen: “Where words fail, music speaks.” The music of South African musicians have indeed spoken to scores of people across the board – our cities, townships, rural areas, sports stadiums and marketplaces are infused and alive with music.

The popular-music legends featured on these stamps were chosen for their innovative music, which brought fundamental change to the perceptions of South Africans and was instrumental in uniting societies. Criteria used in choosing them also included factors such as whether they introduced a completely new, original and distinctively South African style of music.

The musicians are as representative as possible of our society, covering the most important or best-known musical genres, which achieved international success.

James Phillips: 1959-1995

Also known as Bernoldus Niemand. In the musical genre Counter Cultural, Phillips represents a leading influence on the Voëlvry alternative, Afrikaans rock renaissance movement and its impact on South African anti-apartheid protest music. Alongside Koos Kombuis, Valiant Swart, Willem Möller and Johannes Kerkorrel, he was a “cultural icon, voice and conscience to a generation of apartheid-era white South Africans.”

Brenda Fassie: 1964-2004

In the musical genre Afropop, Fassie was one of the most popular urban African musicians of the 1980s and 1990s. She has been described as the “Queen of African Pop” and her bold stage antics earned her a reputation for “outrageousness”. Affectionately called Mabrr by her fans, she was voted 17th on the list of Top 100 Great South Africans.

Johannes Kerkorrel: 1960-2002

Born Ralph Rabie, Kerkorrel was a prolific singer-songwriter in the musical genre Alternative Afrikaans/Voëlvry movement. Described as “one of the leading lights of the rebel Voëlvry movement that blew a new wind across the Afrikaans music scene in the early 1980s”, he exposed a new generation of Afrikaners to political views resisting apartheid. Several artists have recorded tribute songs to his life and work.

Lucky Dube: 1963-2007

As an icon of South African Reggae, Dube pioneered and popularised this genre, which conveyed the Rastafarian philosophy, among township youth. He still influences younger musicians pursuing this style. Dube recorded 22 albums in Zulu, English and Afrikaans in a 25-year period and was South Africa’s biggest-selling Reggae artist. He earned over 20 awards – locally and internationally.

Miriam Makeba: 1932-2008

Makeba, a legend in the musical genre World Music and Mbaqanga, is the most famous South African musician both locally and internationally. Nicknamed Mama Africa, Makeba is a Grammy Award-winner, a civil rights activist and a global icon for women. In the 1960s, she was the first artist from Africa to popularise African music worldwide. In 1987, she performed with Paul Simon in his famous Graceland tour.

Solomon Linda: 1909-1962

Linda, was a musician, singer, composer and innovator of note regarding developing the Isicathimiya musical genre and is credited with a number of musical innovations that came to dominate the Isicathamiya style. He wrote the song Mbube, which later became popular as The Lion Sleeps Tonight, and gave its name to the Mbube style of Isicathamiya a cappella popularised later by Ladysmith Black Mambazo.

Spokes Mashiyane: 1933-1972

Johannes Spokes Mashiyane was regarded as one of the greatest pennywhistle artists who graced the South African Kwêla music scene in the 1950s and 1960s, at a time when that genre was one of the defining styles and the dominant dance music in the country. He later switched to saxophone and was instrumental in Kwêla’s evolution into township jive. He has a strong following to this day.

Simon Nkabinde: 1935-1999

Simon ‘Mahlathini’ Nkabinde is a legendary Mbaqanga singer, a genre of indigenous music that continues to influence musicians worldwide today. Known as the “Lion of Soweto”, Nkabinde is the acknowledged exponent of the deep-voiced, basso profundo style that came to symbolise Mbaqanga music from the mid-60s to the mid-70s. He collaborated on Paul Simon’s groundbreaking Graceland album and tour.

Kippie Moeketsi: 1925-1983

One of South Africa’s greatest Jazz musicians, Moeketsi first played the clarinet, but soon moved on to the saxophone. Influenced by his pianist brother Jacob Moeketsi, Kippie’s career started in shebeens with Band in Blue. He was the driving force in the Jazz Epistles alongside Abdullah Ibrahim, Hugh Masekela, Jonas Gwangwa and Makhaya Ntshoko who recorded the first authentic South African Jazz album.

Taliep Petersen: 1950-2006

Taliep Petersen, was a legendary singer, composer and director, who popularised the so-called Cape Ghoema sound together with David Kramer. In a tribute after his death, he was credited with “rewriting the musical landscape of the Western Cape and enriching the culture of this country.”  He has been awarded  a Lifetime Achievement Award, as well as a Naledi for Best Musical Director/Score/Arrangement for Ghoema.

Classic South African Rock Songs available to download

Many of my favourite South African Rock songs from the 70’s, 80’s and 90’s have been becoming available for download on Rhythm Music Store over the last while.

Here are a few of them, in no particular order:

Sit Dit Af – Johannes Kerkorrel (via 1001 South African Songs You Must Hear Before You Go Deaf)

Sit Dit Af – Johannes Kerkorrel Sit Dit Af – Johannes Kerkorrel (Turn OFF the telly) I’m sure we all loved seeing the friendly face of PW Botha on our TV’s almost every night during those dark days of apartheid. No? I didn’t think so. Well, you are not alone, Johannes Kerkorrel (real name: Ralph John Rabie) felt the same way, but he was the one who sang about it. ‘Sit Dit Af’ was … Read More

via 1001 South African Songs You Must Hear Before You Go Deaf

Lisa se Klavier – Koos Kombuis (via 1001 South African Songs You Must Hear Before You Go Deaf)

Lisa se Klavier – Koos Kombuis Lisa se Klavier – Koos Kombuis (Do tramps really dream of piano playing women?) Koos Kombuis (real name André le Roux du Toit) was one of the leading figures of the Voëlvry tour that brought alternative Afrikaans music to the masses in South Africa. There was a lot of anger at the apartheid government running through the tour and the lyr … Read More

via 1001 South African Songs You Must Hear Before You Go Deaf

Latest Free Music on Channel 24

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Goema For Change

Experience the true spirit of Cape Town’s musical heritage with Jazzing and Jiving, the album that captures the spirit of this magnificent city with a host of accomplished musicians.

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Bay Of Bombay (Live)

A classic live track off this South African pop-folkie’s powerful Shifty album, Hand Around The Heart, on which her incisive vision and wit expose the fabric of white South African suburban life.

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Restriction

First single off the hot new album, A Signal Path, from this highly-rated Cape Town rock band.

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Keep me Awake

A track off the new EP called The Relief from this hard rocking Cape Town band.

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Naked Flame

Red Earth & Rust’s is a compelling new voice in the singer/songwriter genre, with powerful storytelling and soulful lyrics with its new double album Dark Mercy and Wrestling the Angel, from which this song is taken.

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Lovely Day

A track off the album, Singalong African Kidz a very special collection of original children’s songs crafted by renowned singer/songwriter Wendy Oldfield.

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The album Ventilation Vol 3 is by by Slikour who is regarded as one off the freshest and most influential Hip Hop entertainers in SA these days.

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The double CD called ‘Sui’ by this Cape Town trio famed for their improvisational and inspirational musical creations, is regarded as one of their best.

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The Devil Always Wants to Dance

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Special Agents

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Misunderstood

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7 Day Hustle

Kwesta is a young rapper and Buttabing Entertainment’s newest signing who recently released his debut Hip Hop album Special Rekwest here with his first single off the album.

Top Ten Tunes: Top MP3 Downloads at Channel24

Die Radio Kalahari Orkes with Jack Parow – Blaas Jou Vuvuzela

HeuninglandIan Roberts and his bakgat band of boeremusiek brothers team up with super romantic Afrikaans rap star Jack Parow on this tongue-in-cheeky World Cup anthem-in-the-making anthem about braaivleis, brandy and Vuvuzela blowing! Off heir third album of all star collaborations, “Heuningland”.

Download Listen Now

» Read the Review · Listen

Jennifer Ferguson – Where You Gonna Be Tomorrow

“Love knows no colour” is the timeless message of this beautiful African folk pop ballad off the legendary SA songbird’s second album, ‘Untimely’, released on the Shifty label.

Download Listen Now

» Read the Review · Listen

Die Heuwels Fantasties – Our Heritage

Our HeritageHip indie dance rock combo celebrate Heritage Day (aka Braai Day) by hooking up with heavyweight hip-hop players HHP and JR, and the Grammy winning Soweto Gospel Choir. It’s a contagiously fun colab with Die Heuwels’ Pierre Greeff singing in English, HHP and JR keeping it real and the Soweto Gospel Choir adding their soaring African harmonies: “So it’s a flyday. We call it a braai day….”

Download Listen Now

» Read the Review · Listen

Koos Kombuis – Die Groen Fokkol Song

“The problems facing Planet Earth are far more serious than whether we like Malema or not, or what people think of the new ANC leather jackets” says the iconic Afrikaans singer songwriter on this eco-friendly overhaul of his classic protest song about service delivery.

Download Listen Now

» Read the Review · Listen

DJ MuZI.GP – Chemistry

Muzimania UnleashedHot new Gauteng DJ drops another choice Deep Soul House joint off his 15-track dance album, ‘Muzimania Unleashed’.

Download Listen Now

» Read the Review · Listen

No Friends Of Harry – Paint It Black

Legendary SA gothic rockers remind today’s disaffected skinny jeans jet set what real alternative music is all about with this fantastic cover of the Rolling Stones classic. Off their retrospective collection, ‘The Present Has Passed’.

Download Listen Now

» Read the Review · Listen

Dans Republic – Afrikaans

AfrikaansWhat happens when Afrikaans progressive rockers Foto Na Dans invite Flash Republic’s Tamara Dey, Ryan Dent and Craig Massiv to remix one of their unreleased tracks? Imagine Muse dropping a soul-drenched tab of electro dance while giving ‘Die Taal’ the thumbs up and you’re half way there!

Download Listen Now

» Read the Review · Listen

Van Coke Kartel – Voor Ons Stof Word

Them Crooked Vultures get lost in Afrikaans garage rock translation on this suicidally hip new single about seizing the day from Francois Van Coke’s bad ass boys. Off their forthcoming album, ‘Skop Skiet en Donner’.

Download Listen Now

» Read the Review · Listen

Sterling EQ – Nkalakatha

NovaSA’s all-girl instrumental supergroup give Mandoza’s kwaito anthem a chic classical makeover on this sexy single off their new album, ‘Nova’.

Download Listen Now

» Read the Review · Listen · Read more

McCully Workshop – Sweet Fields Of Green

Fans of early Syd Barrett-era Pink Floyd are going to love this progressive pop rock gem off the South African legends’ recently-reissued 1971 album, ‘Genesis’.

Download Listen Now

» Read the Review · Listen

How can I sell my music online?

See Digital Music Sales

This is one of the questions I get asked very often by South African musicians.

In 2002 I was involved with creating the SAmp3. com portal for promoting South African music through free downloads. However there was no real way, at the time, to monetize these free give-aways.

In August 2006, I became a partner in starting Rhythm Online to sell MP3s to the world. This online store is now known as Rhythm Music Store (and also MyMusiek) and if you are a talented musician, published or unpublished, fill in the online electronic distribution agreement to have your tunes listed on Rhythm Online Music Store.

Would you like the world to hear and buy your music?

SAmp3. com can help you promote your music through channel24 and sell your MP3s to the world on the RhythmMusicStore.com.

And the best part is, there is no cost to you!

Music Sales:

If you wish to sell your music on RhythmMusicStore.com you will need to complete the easy online agreement.

All the information you need can be found there.

Currently Rhythm Music Store is only able to accommodate artists and labels with bank accounts in South Africa.

For selling MP3s on Rhythm Music Store we require a physical audio CD or CD-R for  for the following reasons:

  • Quality Control
  • Naming Convention
  • Creation of 30 second samples

Single songs are also fine (we list it as a album with only one track, and with its own artwork and blurb), but we still require the music to be supplied on an audio CD, please.

Postal address:
Rhythm Music Store
PO Box 399
Century City
7446
Cape Town

Physical address:

Brian Currin
c/o Mabu Vinyl
2 Rheede Street
Gardens
Cape Town
[Click here for a map]

Free Promotional Give-aways:

Please contact:

Stephen “Sugar” Segerman:
email: sugar@samp3.com
Phone: 021-423-7635 (office hours)

We will need your song(s) on an audio CD or CD-R, mailed, couriered or hand-delivered to us, so that we can rip the mp3s. We will also need some info about the band/artist and your authorisation of our use of your tracks as free mp3 downloads. You need only supply one copy of each album for both Rhythm Music Store and SAmp3.com

For free promotional give-aways you can also email your MP3s to brian@samp3.com

By sending MP3s to brian@samp3.com you are authorizing them to be used as free downloads.

Please do not send MP3s for selling on RhythmMusicStore.com, please see reasons above.

Postal address:
SAmp3.com
PO Box 399
Century City
7446
Cape Town

Physical address:
Mabu Vinyl
2 Rheede Street
Gardens
Cape Town
[Click here for a map]

Top Ten Tunes: Top Mp3 Downloads on Channel24

Die Radio Kalahari Orkes with Jack Parow – Blaas Jou Vuvuzela

HeuninglandIan Roberts and his bakgat band of boeremusiek brothers team up with super romantic Afrikaans rap star Jack Parow on this tongue-in-cheeky World Cup anthem-in-the-making anthem about braaivleis, brandy and Vuvuzela blowing! Off heir third album of all star collaborations, “Heuningland”.

Download Listen Now

» Read the Review · Listen

Koos Kombuis – Die Groen Fokkol Song

“The problems facing Planet Earth are far more serious than whether we like Malema or not, or what people think of the new ANC leather jackets” says the iconic Afrikaans singer songwriter on this eco-friendly overhaul of his classic protest song about service delivery.

Download Listen Now

» Read the Review · Listen

Die Heuwels Fantasties – Our Heritage

Our HeritageHip indie dance rock combo celebrate Heritage Day (aka Braai Day) by hooking up with heavyweight hip-hop players HHP and JR, and the Grammy winning Soweto Gospel Choir. It’s a contagiously fun colab with Die Heuwels’ Pierre Greeff singing in English, HHP and JR keeping it real and the Soweto Gospel Choir adding their soaring African harmonies: “So it’s a flyday. We call it a braai day….”

Download Listen Now

» Read the Review · Listen

Sterling EQ – Nkalakatha

SA’s all-girl instrumental supergroup give Mandoza’s kwaito anthem a chic classical makeover on this sexy single off their new album, ‘Nova’.

Download Listen Now

» Read the Review · Listen · Read more

Van Coke Kartel – Voor Ons Stof Word

Skop Skiet en DonnerThem Crooked Vultures get lost in Afrikaans garage rock translation on this suicidally hip new single about seizing the day from Francois Van Coke’s bad ass boys. Off their forthcoming album, ‘Skop Skiet en Donner’.

Download Listen Now

» Read the Review · Listen

Dans Republic – Afrikaans

What happens when Afrikaans progressive rockers Foto Na Dans invite Flash Republic’s Tamara Dey, Ryan Dent and Craig Massiv to remix one of their unreleased tracks? Imagine Muse dropping a soul-drenched tab of electro dance while giving ‘Die Taal’ the thumbs up and you’re half way there!

Download Listen Now

» Read the Review · Listen

DJ MuZI.GP – Chemistry

Muzimania UnleashedHot new Gauteng DJ drops another choice Deep Soul House joint off his 15-track dance album, ‘Muzimania Unleashed’.

Download Listen Now

» Read the Review · Listen

Gereformeerde Blues Band – Almal Moet Gerook Raak

Johannes Kerkorrel and his alternative Afrikaans pioneers shake off apartheid’s Calvinist shackles on this classic live cut about the healing wonders of the weed. Off the ‘Voëlvry Die Toer’ album.

Download Listen Now

» Read the Review · Listen

The Helicopters – Don’t Wanna Live In Hollywood

The Best Of the HelicoptersEnjoy this seminal slice of 80s SA new wave pop courtesy of singer/songwriter Bernard Binns and his band of Vereeniging New Romantic brothers. It’s an infectiously funky live version of their Top 10 hit, off the RetroFresh compilation album, ‘The Best Of The Helicopters’.

Download Listen Now

» Read the Review · Listen

Ike Moriz – What A Wonderful World

Classy Cape Town crooner serenades us with a smooth jazzy rendition of Louis Armstrong’s beautiful ballad. Off his 8th studio album entitled ‘Blue Moon’.

Download Listen Now

» Read the Review · Listen

Top Ten Tunes: Top Mp3 Downloads on Channel 24

Die Radio Kalahari Orkes with Jack Parow – Blaas Jou Vuvuzela

HeuninglandIan Roberts and his bakgat band of boeremusiek brothers team up with super romantic Afrikaans rap star Jack Parow on this tongue-in-cheeky World Cup anthem-in-the-making anthem about braaivleis, brandy and Vuvuzela blowing! Off heir third album of all star collaborations, “Heuningland”.

Download Listen Now

» Read the Review · Listen

Koos Kombuis – Die Groen Fokkol Song

“The problems facing Planet Earth are far more serious than whether we like Malema or not, or what people think of the new ANC leather jackets” says the iconic Afrikaans singer songwriter on this eco-friendly overhaul of his classic protest song about service delivery.

Download Listen Now

» Read the Review · Listen

Die Heuwels Fantasties – Our Heritage

Our HeritageHip indie dance rock combo celebrate Heritage Day (aka Braai Day) by hooking up with heavyweight hip-hop players HHP and JR, and the Grammy winning Soweto Gospel Choir. It’s a contagiously fun colab with Die Heuwels’ Pierre Greeff singing in English, HHP and JR keeping it real and the Soweto Gospel Choir adding their soaring African harmonies: “So it’s a flyday. We call it a braai day….”

Download Listen Now

» Read the Review · Listen

Gereformeerde Blues Band – Almal Moet Gerook Raak

Johannes Kerkorrel and his alternative Afrikaans pioneers shake off apartheid’s Calvinist shackles on this classic live cut about the healing wonders of the weed. Off the ‘Voëlvry Die Toer’ album.

Download Listen Now

» Read the Review · Listen

Sterling EQ – Nkalakatha

NovaSA’s all-girl instrumental supergroup give Mandoza’s kwaito anthem a chic classical makeover on this sexy single off their new album, ‘Nova’.

Download Listen Now

» Read the Review · Listen · Read more

Dans Republic – Afrikaans

What happens when Afrikaans progressive rockers Foto Na Dans invite Flash Republic’s Tamara Dey, Ryan Dent and Craig Massiv to remix one of their unreleased tracks? Imagine Muse dropping a soul-drenched tab of electro dance while giving ‘Die Taal’ the thumbs up and you’re half way there!

Download Listen Now

» Read the Review · Listen

Van Coke Kartel – Voor Ons Stof Word

Skop Skiet en DonnerThem Crooked Vultures get lost in Afrikaans garage rock translation on this suicidally hip new single about seizing the day from Francois Van Coke’s bad ass boys. Off their forthcoming album, ‘Skop Skiet en Donner’.

Download Listen Now

» Read the Review · Listen

DJ MuZI.GP – Inhliziyo Yami

Rising Jozi star gives Mzansi house fans their fix with this contagious fusion of soulfully deep, hip shaking homegrown grooves featuring Zimkitha. Off his brand new 15-track dance album, ‘Muzimania Unleashed’.

Download Listen Now

» Read the Review · Listen

Ike Moriz – What A Wonderful World

Blue MoonClassy Cape Town crooner serenades us with a smooth jazzy rendition of Louis Armstrong’s beautiful ballad. Off his 8th studio album entitled ‘Blue Moon’.

Download Listen Now

» Read the Review · Listen

The Helicopters – Don’t Wanna Live In Hollywood

Enjoy this seminal slice of 80s SA new wave pop courtesy of singer/songwriter Bernard Binns and his band of Vereeniging New Romantic brothers. It’s an infectiously funky live version of their Top 10 hit, off the RetroFresh compilation album, ‘The Best Of The Helicopters’.

Download Listen Now

» Read the Review · Listen

Top Ten Tunes: Free MP3 Downloads at Channel 24

Bernoldus Niemand – Snôr City

Wie Is Bernoldus Niemand?Ever wonder where ‘Alternative Afrikaans’ started? Tune into this classic satire of moustachioed Pretoria men and all they symbolised back in the bad old apartheid days. Off legendary rock rebel, James Phillips’ cult classic ‘Wie Is Bernoldus Niemand?’, released on the seminal Shifty Records label.

Download Listen Now

» Read the Review · Listen

Die Radio Kalahari Orkes with Jack Parow – Blaas Jou Vuvuzela

Ian Roberts and his bakgat band of boeremusiek brothers team up with super romantic Afrikaans rap star Jack Parow on this tongue-in-cheeky World Cup anthem-in-the-making anthem about braaivleis, brandy and Vuvuzela blowing! Off heir third album of all star collaborations, “Heuningland”.

Download Listen Now

» Read the Review · Listen

Die Heuwels Fantasties – Our Heritage

Our HeritageHip indie dance rock combo celebrate Heritage Day (aka Braai Day) by hooking up with heavyweight hip-hop players HHP and JR, and the Grammy winning Soweto Gospel Choir. It’s a contagiously fun colab with Die Heuwels’ Pierre Greeff singing in English, HHP and JR keeping it real and the Soweto Gospel Choir adding their soaring African harmonies: “So it’s a flyday. We call it a braai day….”

Download Listen Now

» Read the Review · Listen

Dans Republic – Afrikaans

What happens when Afrikaans progressive rockers Foto Na Dans invite Flash Republic’s Tamara Dey, Ryan Dent and Craig Massiv to remix one of their unreleased tracks? Imagine Muse dropping a soul-drenched tab of electro dance while giving ‘Die Taal’ the thumbs up and you’re half way there!

Download Listen Now

» Read the Review · Listen

Koos Kombuis – Almal wil ‘n Huisie by die See Hê

Almal wil 'n Huisie by die See HêThe legendary Afrikaans troubadour gives this winsome ballad off his classic ‘Madiba Bay’ a lyrical makeover to include digital innovations like ADSL and Skype. Bakgat, bru!

Download Listen Now

» Read the Review · Listen

Van Coke Kartel – Voor Ons Stof Word

Them Crooked Vultures get lost in Afrikaans garage rock translation on this suicidally hip new single about seizing the day from Francois Van Coke’s bad ass boys. Off their forthcoming album, ‘Skop Skiet en Donner’.

Download Listen Now

» Read the Review · Listen

Koos Kombuis – Lisa se Klavier

Niemandsland & Beyond!Legendary singer songwriter maps the moment he morphed from Andre Letoit into mythical alternative Afrikaans troubadour Koos Kombuis on this classic Voelvry-era acoustic ballad off his excellent debut, ‘Niemandsland & Beyond!’.

Download Listen Now

» Read the Review · Listen

aKING – The Heart Of A Fool

“I know my language has always been my limit…/the heart of the fool lives inside of his mouth,” serenades Laudo on this spanking new symphonic rock power ballad off the indie rock darlings’ brand new CD, ‘Against All Odds’. Produced by the multiple award-winning Theo Crous.

Download Listen Now

» Read the Review · Listen

DJ MuZI.GP – Inhliziyo Yami

Muzimania UnleashedRising Jozi star gives Mzansi house fans their fix with this contagious fusion of soulfully deep, hip shaking homegrown grooves featuring Zimkitha. Off his brand new 15-track dance album, ‘Muzimania Unleashed’.

Download Listen Now

» Read the Review · Listen

Wasserfall – Pretoria Wes

Looking for a lekker tjune to soundtrack your next car cruise from Pretoria West to Hartebeespoort Dam? Tune into Dewald Wasserfall (vocals, guitar) and Larry Pullen’s (guitar) buoyant melodic rocker about going nowhere slowly. Off their debut album ‘Asem In’.

Download Listen Now

» Read the Review · Listen

Top Ten Tunes: Free MP3 Downloads from Channel24

Koos Kombuis – Almal wil ‘n Huisie by die See Hê

Almal wil 'n Huisie by die See HêThe legendary Afrikaans troubadour gives this winsome ballad off his classic ‘Madiba Bay’ a lyrical makeover to include digital innovations like ADSL and Skype. Bakgat, bru!

Download Listen Now

» Read the Review · Listen

Die Radio Kalahari Orkes with Jack Parow – Blaas Jou Vuvuzela

Ian Roberts and his bakgat band of boeremusiek brothers team up with super romantic Afrikaans rap star Jack Parow on this tongue-in-cheeky World Cup anthem-in-the-making anthem about braaivleis, brandy and Vuvuzela blowing! Off heir third album of all star collaborations, “Heuningland”.

Download Listen Now

» Read the Review · Listen

Bernoldus Niemand – Snôr City

Wie Is Bernoldus Niemand?Ever wonder where ‘Alternative Afrikaans’ started? Tune into this classic satire of moustachioed Pretoria men and all they symbolised back in the bad old apartheid days. Off legendary rock rebel, James Phillips’ cult classic ‘Wie Is Bernoldus Niemand?’, released on the seminal Shifty Records label.

Download Listen Now

» Read the Review · Listen

Die Heuwels Fantasties – Our Heritage

Hip indie dance rock combo celebrate Heritage Day (aka Braai Day) by hooking up with heavyweight hip-hop players HHP and JR, and the Grammy winning Soweto Gospel Choir. It’s a contagiously fun colab with Die Heuwels’ Pierre Greeff singing in English, HHP and JR keeping it real and the Soweto Gospel Choir adding their soaring African harmonies: “So it’s a flyday. We call it a braai day….”

Download Listen Now

» Read the Review · Listen

Dans Republic – Afrikaans

AfrikaansWhat happens when Afrikaans progressive rockers Foto Na Dans invite Flash Republic’s Tamara Dey, Ryan Dent and Craig Massiv to remix one of their unreleased tracks? Imagine Muse dropping a soul-drenched tab of electro dance while giving ‘Die Taal’ the thumbs up and you’re half way there!

Download Listen Now

» Read the Review · Listen

Van Coke Kartel – Voor Ons Stof Word

Them Crooked Vultures get lost in Afrikaans garage rock translation on this suicidally hip new single about seizing the day from Francois Van Coke’s bad ass boys. Off their forthcoming album, ‘Skop Skiet en Donner’.

Download Listen Now

» Read the Review · Listen

Koos Kombuis – Lisa se Klavier

Niemandsland & Beyond!Legendary singer songwriter maps the moment he morphed from Andre Letoit into mythical alternative Afrikaans troubadour Koos Kombuis on this classic Voelvry-era acoustic ballad off his excellent debut, ‘Niemandsland & Beyond!’.

Download Listen Now

» Read the Review · Listen

aKING – The Heart Of A Fool

“I know my language has always been my limit…/the heart of the fool lives inside of his mouth,” serenades Laudo on this spanking new symphonic rock power ballad off the indie rock darlings’ brand new CD, ‘Against All Odds’. Produced by the multiple award-winning Theo Crous.

Download Listen Now

» Read the Review · Listen

Malika Ndlovu – Wishing For The World You See

Womb To World: A Labour of LoveCelebrated performance poet shares this joyous gem about motherhood. Off her album, ‘Womb To World: A Labour of Love’ fetauring original ambient soundscapes by Garth Erasmus.

Download Listen Now

» Read the Review · Listen

DJ MuZI.GP – Inhliziyo Yami

Rising Jozi star gives Mzansi house fans their fix with this contagious fusion of soulfully deep, hip shaking homegrown grooves featuring Zimkitha. Off his brand new 15-track dance album, ‘Muzimania Unleashed’.

Download Listen Now

» Read the Review · Listen

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