The 100 greatest South African songs | TimesLive

From TimesLive

Abdullah Ibrahim - image: Sunday Times
Abdullah Ibrahim – image: Sunday Times

The full 100

Here they are, in chronological order, chosen by a 20-strong panel of LS writers using three criteria: 1) musical brilliance; 2) popular success; 3) impact on the national mind. Some tracks aced one category and flunked the other two, but plenty ticked all three boxes. Which immortal hits have we missed? Tune us the odds at lifestyle@sundaytimes.co.za

1. Phalafala Dolly Rathebe and the Elite Swingsters (1964)

2. Pata Pata Miriam Makeba (written in 1957 with Dorothy Masuka, but a global hit in 1967)

3. Master Jack Four Jacks And A Jill (1968)

4. Yakhal’ Inkomo Winston “Mankunku” Ngozi (1968)

5. For your Precious Love The Flames (1968)

6. The Seagull’s Name Was Nelson Des and Dawn Lindberg (1971)

7. Nomathemba Letta Mbulu (1973)

8. Mama Tembu’s Wedding Margaret Singana (1973)

9. Stimela Hugh Masekela (1974)

10. Mannenberg Abdullah Ibrahim (1974)

11. Charlie Rabbitt (1975)

12. Blues For a Hip King Abdullah Ibrahim (1975)

13. Marabi Malombo (1976)

14. Chocolate Toffee Saitana (1976)

15. Substitute Clout (1978)

16. Universal Men Juluka (1979)

17. ZX Dan The Radio Rats (1979)

18. Jo Bangles Baxtop (1979)

19. Paradise Road Joy (1980)

20. Party Harari (1981)

21. Man on the Moon Ballyhoo (1981)

22. Impi Juluka (1981)

23. The Bushman Steve Kekana (1982)

24. Isiphiwo Soul Brothers (1982)

25. Hey Boy Via Afrika (1983)

26. Shadows éVoid (1983)

27. Weekend Special Brenda Fassie (1983)

28. Shot Down The Cherry Faced Lurchers (1983)

29. See Yourself (Clowns) Ella Mental (1984)

30. Burnout Sipho “Hotstix” Mabuse (1984)

31. Is it an Ism or is it Art? Niki Daly (1984)

32. Jabulani Hotline featuring PJ Powers (1984)

33. I’m in Love with a DJ Yvonne Chaka Chaka (1985)

34. Stimela sazeZola – Mbongeni Ngema (1985)

35. Reggae Vibes is Cool Bernoldus Niemand (1985)

36. This Boy Sweatband (1986)

37. National Madness The Aeroplanes (1986)

38. Change is Pain Mzwakhe Mbuli (1986)

39. Homeless Ladysmith Black Mambazo (1986)

40. Johnny Calls the Chemist Falling Mirror (1986)

41. Now or Never Sankomota (1987)

42. Ten Ten Special African Jazz Pioneers (1987)

43. Scatterlings of Africa Johnny Clegg and Savuka (1987)

44. Weeping Bright Blue (1987)

45. Hillbrow Johannes Kerkorrel (1988)

46. Quick Quick Marcalex (1989)

47. Slave Lucky Dube (1990)

48. Shake Tananas (1990)

49. Special Star Mango Groove (1990)

50. Tomorrow Nation O’Yaba (1991)

51. I’m in Love with a Rastaman Mahlathini and the Mahotella Queens (1991)

52. Sarafina! Hugh Masekela (1992)

53. It’s About Time Boom Shaka (1993)

54. The Crossing Johnny Clegg (1993)

55. Mmalo-We Bayete (1994)

56. Never Again Prophets of Da City (1994)

57. When You Come Back Vusi Mahlasela (1994)

58. Waar Was Jy? Skeem (1994)

59. Sea Level Urban Creep (1995)

60. The Child Inside Qkumba Zoo (1995)

61. Kaffir Arthur Mafokate (1995)

62. African Dream Vicky Sampson (1996)

63. Kiss the Machine Battery 9 (1996)

64. Magasman Trompies (1997)

65. Stand in your Way Just Jinger (1997)

66. Fords Nissans Toys en Beetles Brasse vannie Kaap (1997)

67. Shibobo TKZee (1998)

68. Vul’indlela Brenda Fassie (1998)

69. Yehlisan’ Umoya Busi Mhlongo (1998)

70. Sondela Ringo Madlingozi (1999)

71. Thathi Sgubu Bongo Maffin (1999)

72. Blue Eyes Springbok Nude Girls (1999)

73. Genes & Spirits Moses Molelekwa (2000)

74. Born in a Taxi Blk Sonshine (2000)

75. Nkalakatha Mandoza (2000)

76. Afrikaners is Plesierig Karen Zoid (2001)

77. Meisie Meisie Kurt Darren (2001)

78. Ghetto Fabulous Zola & Kaybee (2002)

79. Ndihamba Nawe Mafikizolo (2002)

80. Ayelekile Amasango Ismael (2002)

81. Picture Perfect Perez (2002)

82. Midnight 340ml (2003)

83. Umoya Skwatta Kamp (2003)

84. Nomvula (After the Rain) Freshlyground 2003

85. Destiny Malaika (2004)

86. Nizalwa Ngobani Thandiswa Mazwai (2004)

87. Matofotofo Pitch Black Afro (2004)

88. Akekh’ uGogo Mzekezeke (2005)

89. Whistling in Tongues Felix Laband (2005)

90. De La Rey Bok van Blerk (2006)

91. Sister Bethina Mgarimbe (2006)

92. Feel Good Lira (2007)

93. Bantu Biko Street Simphiwe Dana (2007)

94. Show Dem (Make the Circle Bigger) JR feat Hip-Hop Pantsula (2009)

95. Cooler as Ekke Jack Parow (2010)

96. Enter the Ninja Die Antwoord (2010)

97. Fairytale Liquideep (2010)

98. Tot Die Son Uitkom Van Coke Cartel (2011)

99. Loliwe Zahara (2011)

100. Hosanna The Brother Moves on (2013)

SA music comes up trumps at Music Exchange 2013

South African music is entering an exciting era of opportunity and progress as new markets open up for homegrown sounds. This was one of the key messages emerging from the 2013 Music Exchange Conference, which saw industry moguls and musicians congregating at the iconic Cape Town City Hall to talk about the serious business of music.

Music Exchange 2013
Music Exchange 2013
Music Exchange 2013
Music Exchange 2013
Music Exchange 2013
Trevor Jones, Randall Abrahams

For three days, from 21 to 23 March 2013, the City Hall was abuzz with the sound of music – with a full programme of workshops and panel discussions on making it, marketing it, getting it heard on various platforms and ensuring that it moves with the times.

This independent music conference, now in its third year, attracted hundreds of experts and delegates from across the music spectrum – from composers and publishers to record company executives and media – to share knowledge and ideas, network, perform live showcases and identify opportunities to boost South African music locally, regionally and abroad.

Among the high-profile music creators spotted at the conference were Vicky Sampson, Mynie Grové, Sipho “Hotstix” Mabuse, RJ Benjamin, Chad Saaiman, Jimmy Nevis, Mark Haze, Dub Masta China and Arno Carstens, as well as industry heavyweights such as Universal Music A&R consultant Benjy Mudie, Cape Town Jazz festival founder Rashid Lombard and Rolling Stone SA editor-in-chief Miles Keylock.

The international speakers on the programme included acclaimed house music producer and remixer Charles Webster (UK), music promoter Doug Davenport (USA) and Africori CEO Yoel Kenan (France).

One of the conference’s undisputed highlights was the keynote address by Trevor Jones, moderated by Universal Records managing director Randall Abrahams. Now based in the UK, Jones was born in District Six and is considered one of the top five film score composers in the world, with several Golden Globe and BAFTA nominations as well two ASCAP Awards in the bag.

Jones has made an indelible mark on the global entertainment industry, scoring international blockbusters such as Notting Hill, The Last of the Mohicans, Mississippi Burning and The Mighty and working with the likes of U2, Sting, David Bowie, Sinead O’Connor, Britney Spears, Elvis Costello and Charlotte Church.

Jones became overcome with emotion after being given a standing ovation by delegates, who warmly welcomed him back home.

During his inspirational talk, he spoke about the importance of music education and his desire to give something back to South African music industry: “Key to South Africa’s success is hard work and building a positive perception of our country and us a nation,” he said.

Award-winning local singer, songwriter and guitarist Arno Carstens, who spoke at the conference about the song that made him famous, said it was an honour to be part of Music Exchange and it was encouraging and inspiring to see so many enthusiastic people attend and share their experiences and knowledge.

Joining Carstens on the stellar line-up of artists speaking about the song that made them famous, Vicky Sampson acknowledged songwriter Alan Lazar (formerly of Mango Groove, and now a successful composer based in Los Angeles), who wrote African Dream. “I am grateful that Alan gave me the song and did not pass me up for Mango Groove’s Claire Johnston,” Sampson quipped. She spent every minute of the conference absorbing and learning, as well as reconnecting with her mentor Benjy Mudie and her old friend RJ Benjamin.

Versatile singer, composer and teacher Benjamin, who has been invited to be a vocal coach for the upcoming season of Idols and will be composing SABC2’s new signature tune, continuously urged delegates to make use of social media platforms to reach new audiences. Benjamin stood out as one of the speakers to whom delegates were drawn and his presentations proved to be extremely popular.

After the weekend’s proceedings wrapped up, local music legend Hotstix tweeted: “What a conference; what great speakers and delegates – wow!”

Added a delighted Music Exchange founder and board member, Martin Myers: “We have been completely overwhelmed by the positive feedback we’ve received, and the animated conversations on social media platforms about the success of Music Exchange.

“Recording and performing artists, as well as composers and other industry players, have complimented the conference for being relevant, engaging and thought-provoking. There was a strong focus on the business side of music, which elevated this event above a mere talk shop: they left with useful, practical information that will undoubtedly be of immense value in their various professional ventures.”

Visit www.musicexchange.co.za to find out more about next year’s Music Exchange conference, or follow @musicexchange on Twitter.

Issued by JT Communication Solutions on Behalf of Music Exchange – www.musicexchange.co.za

Top 12 2012: Top 12 plaaslike CD-uitreikings vir 2012 – Albert du Plessis | LitNet

Here is a list of 12 South African albums released this year that have captured my imagination for various reasons.

They made me think, or they made me cry, or they made me remember, or they made want to dance, or they were just plain fun.

Cheers

Brian

Hugh Masekela – Playing @ Work
Lyzyrd Kyngs – One Night Only
Toya Delazy – Due Drop
Van Coke Kartel – Wie’s bang
Les Javan – Ek is lief vir jou
Kongos – Lunatic
Rockville 2069
The Muffinz – Have You Heard
Jeremy de Tolly – Piano Nocturnes Volume One
Gerald Clark – Black Water
Various Artists – Pretville (soundtrack)
The Buckfever Underground – Verkeerdevlei

via Top 12 2012: Top 12 plaaslike CD-uitreikings vir 2012 – Albert du Plessis | LitNet.

In the interest of better service

Running a successful business without being controlled by phones … The Production Person does it and so does Brian Currin Music / Brian, My Web Guy.

The Production Person

Over the past few years I have come to view my cell phone as a burden. It rings and beeps constantly, so I decided that when I was with clients to switch it of and when I needed to put my head down and focus to switch it off. It has now developed into a device that I use when and if it is convenient for me. It no longer irritates me, it no longer interrupts me, it no longer creates anxiety – IT IS NO LONGER A BURDEN.

I am always contactable all the time via email and can access my account from any computer worldwide which I now do. When I’m at suppliers I quickly check mail and access priorities. And just to be clear it has not effected my earnings in any way – on the contrary my earnings have quadrupled over the past year.

I can…

View original post 146 more words

The Virtual Braai

Twitter is like those newspaper headlines that you see on lampposts. Just a quick bit of news to encourage you to investigate more. Minute-by-minute information of what is happening right now.

Facebook is like a newspaper that you buy and scan through, picking out the interesting bits and throwing the rest away. Day-by-day information of what is happening in your world.

A Blog is like a magazine, that you read more thoroughly, and perhaps even keep for future reference.

A Website is like a coffee table book with lots of detailed information on a subject you are really interested in.

And all of this is so we can stand around our Virtual Braai and discuss topics that are close to our hearts.

Rodriguez: The John Samson Story

Guest post by John Samson, author of Cold Fiction.

Cold Fiction
Cold Fiction
Cold Fact (SA)
Cold Fact (SA)

I often joke with people in the UK that I didn’t leave South Africa of my own free will, but was actually kicked out because I was not fanatical about rugby and I didn’t drink, both activities that white South African males are meant to excel at. I could also have said in 1996, when I moved from South Africa to the UK, that a further reason for my being exiled was that I did not own a copy of ‘Cold Fact’ by Rodriguez. However no one in the UK would have understood what I was talking about.

But now with Malik Bendjelloul’s brilliant film ‘Searching For Sugar Man’ bringing Rodriguez to the world’s attention, I can mention the omission in my music collection and not be met with question mark faces. I am still not a huge rugby fan and have not taken to drinking alcohol, but I did rectify the lack of ‘Cold Fact’ problem on one of my early trips back to SA a couple of years after moving. I had been familiar with the album’s distinctive cover from many an hour spent flicking through the albums at my local record shop, but as a teenager in the 80’s I was hell bent on finding the next big New Romantic band and had no interest in ‘fossil music’ as I thought of it back then.

Searching For Sugar Man
Searching For Sugar Man

A further reason for the lack of ‘Cold Fact’ in my collection was that I managed to avoid military training (where a lot of guys were introduced to Rodriguez’ music) and counted my days working at the Receiver of Revenue, which I regarded as the lesser of two evils. Purchasing ‘Cold Fact’ became almost mandatory when I was lucky enough to befriend Brian Currin and Stephen ‘Sugar’ Segerman, both of whom played a part in discovering the fate of Rodriguez. I was drawn into the world of the SA Rock Digest, an online music magazine focussing on South African Rock music, which Brian and Sugar had set up. With two such music aficionados as friends, I quickly discovered gaping holes in my music knowledge, especially regarding the rock scene in South African in the 70’s.

I began to correct this problem so as not to look foolish in front of my new found friends and part of the polyfilla (spackling paste to those not familiar with this brand) to mend the gaps was purchasing a copy of ‘Cold Fact.’ I don’t recall ever having heard the album before that and, given its banned status on the radio, could not have unknowingly heard it there, but as the first chords of ‘Sugar Man’ wafted through my speakers, I knew the song. It was as if it was a part of the ether in South Africa and had just soaked into me whether I had heard it or not. ‘I Wonder’ was also familiar to me and the rest of the album, although less soaked in, was also striking a nagging familiar chord.

Yes, unless you believe in the collective consciousness, I must have heard the album somewhere before that ‘first’ listen, but I cannot for the life of me remember where. That said, a part of me does like to believe that the music was just in the air we breathed in SA, that it was, and will always just somehow be there, as essentially part of life as oxygen and sunshine. This image, to me, seems to fit in with the mystical and almost mythical character that is Rodriguez.

Searching For Sugar Man
Searching For Sugar Man

Rodriguez and his place in The Story Of Rock

Willem, Rodriguez, Brian, Sugar 1998
Willem, Rodriguez, Brian, Sugar 1998

Almost all the recent fan messages on the Sugarman.org website are from people saying they have never heard of Rodriguez before. Many even apologize for not listening to him in the 1970s.

I can’t remember when exactly I first heard ‘Cold Fact’. For me his music just always seemed to have been there. A number of the mixtapes from my teenage years show “Sugar Man”, “Rich Folks Hoax” and “I Wonder” as being from 1973/74 when I was about 14/15.

I was wrong, of course, but didn’t know that until much later.

A long time ago, I compiled a series of C90 mixtapes called The Story Of Rock, with all the information lovingly catalogued and hand-written in hard cover books.

Page 13 of Book 7 shows the track listing for “The Story Of Rock 1973 to 1974” and includes the following songs:

  • Long Train Running – The Doobie Brothers
  • We Live – Xit
  • Sugar Man – Rodriguez
  • Radar Love – Golden Earring
  • Smoke On The Water – Deep Purple
  • Sweet Home Alabama – Lynyrd Skynyrd
  • The Ballad Of Casey Deiss – Shawn Phillips
  • Rich Folks Hoax – Rodriguez
  • We’re An American Band – Grand Funk Railroad

Other artists include Led Zeppelin, The Allman Brothers Band, Yes, Focus, Chicago and more. And Rodriguez was the only one that got two entries! The next page shows “The Story Of Rock 1974 to 1976” and includes “I Wonder” alongside songs by Black Sabbath, Jethro Tull, Thin Lizzy, Rory Gallagher, Pink Floyd, Genesis, David Bowie, Frank Zappa, Uriah Heep, Nazareth and others.

Cold Fact
Cold Fact

I am finding it impossible to imagine what it must be like to not grow up listening to his music alongside all those other well-known classic rock bands. I know I never heard him on the radio, but that wasn’t that strange as a number of my “Story Of Rock” artists didn’t get much radio play any way.

But that he wasn’t famous in the rest of the world, didn’t cross my mind. When I first discovered the internet during the 1996 Festive Season, I could find information on Pink Floyd and Deep Purple, however I could find nothing on Rodriguez. And that started me on a quest, that just seems to be continuously having happy endings.

Without trying to sound too melodramatic, I would not be living the life I do now, and earning my income from doing what I love, if it was not for Rodriguez and all the sparks that he ignited.

Maak ’n pyp en dans (’n Begeleide trippie op soek na die droom) – Albert du Plessis | LitNet

Albert du Plessis

Na wie se pype dans jy? Betrap jouself in ’n goeie bui met ’n massiewe klankstelsel en verloor beheer in die ekstase van ’n smerige Hammond- of pyporrelsolo wat disrespekvol en met minagting tot diép in die rooi in gespeel word. – Albert du Plessis


via Maak ’n pyp en dans (’n Begeleide trippie op soek na die droom) – Albert du Plessis | LitNet.

A WordPress.com Website is the perfect solution for Musicians

These people say ... Brian Currin is My Web Guy
These people all say … Brian Currin is My Web Guy

WordPress.com is the perfect website solution for people who want to:

  • promote their music
  • connect with their fans
  • do their own updates
  • showcase their videos
  • showcase their photos
  • showcase their music
  • save money

Some Questions People Ask

Q. What are the benefits of WordPress.com?

A. There are many benefits, here are some of the main ones:

  • Free web hosting
  • Free web themes
  • Free Content Management System
  • Ability to include own header and background on most themes
  • Google-friendly
  • Mobile-friendly
  • YouTube, Soundcloud, Google Maps, etc can be embedded
  • Contact Form – helps reduce spam
  • Social Media feeds can be embedded
  • Blog can update Social Media platforms automatically
  • Analytical Information
  • Premium themes and upgrades available at reasonable prices

 

Q. Aren’t websites expensive?

A. They don’t have to be. Depending on your requirements, you really don’t need to break the bank. A WordPress.com website can be set up without incurring costs for web hosting, graphic design and web development. Read more.

Q. What is the difference between WordPress.com and WordPress.org?

A. Basically a WordPress.com website is ideal for people who want to get on with focussing on running their business.

WordPress.org is great if you are happy to pay for web hosting and pay a web developer for their time.  Read more.

Life Is A Long Song

[Thanks to Jethro Tull for the post title]

Just a few of my favourite really long songs.

Thick As A Brick – Jethro Tull

Supper’s Ready – Genesis

Karn Evil 9 – Emerson, Lake and Palmer

Close To The Edge – Yes

Tubular Bells – Mike Oldfield

Phallus Dei – Amon Düül II

Autobahn – Kraftwerk

Ma – Rare Earth

Get Ready – Rare Earth

Just A Poke (album) – Sweet Smoke: Baby Night & Silly Sally

Includes an excerpt from The Soft Parade by The Doors and a wonderfully phased drum solo.

Shine On You Crazy Diamond, parts 1-9 – Pink Floyd

On the ‘Wish You Were Here’ album, this song is split into two sections, separated by the other 3 songs on the album. Here it can be heard as one long piece.

Anonymus Two – Focus

Tarkus – Emerson, Lake & Palmer

Echoes – Pink Floyd

Salisbury – Uriah Heep

In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida – Iron Butterfly

Ordinary length songs are often stretched incredibly during live performances, here’s one of them:

Dazed And Confused (live 1973) – Led Zeppelin

And here’s another:

Space Truckin’ – live 1974 – Deep Purple

And just for laughs:

Metal Machine Music – Lou Reed

This double album, consisting of 4 sides of equal length, is like one of those really bad movies that you keep watching hoping it will get better.

Spoiler alert:  it doesn’t.

These are not the fans you looking for

Over the last while I have noticed the following type of marketing approach:

“If you are bored, please listen to our radio show”

“If you have nothing else to do, please come to our concert / gig / show”

“If you have some spare time, could you please …?”

Are these really the people you want as your fans?

People that are bored and have nothing else to do.

Time to set your sights a little bit higher.

If you don’t believe that what you do is important, then why should anybody else.

Create an experience that is unmissable, and people will find the time, whether it is spare or not, and not only because they have absolutely nothing better to do.

Billy Forrest: A Selection Of My Favourite Songs

From Billy Forrest

Billy Forrest - A special selection of my favourite songs
Billy Forrest - A special selection of my favourite songs

It was a difficult one this. To remember my favourites over a span of 55 years was no mean feat, who do you leave out? I’ve chosen the songs that moved me the most, with just that “something” that makes a song reach into your soul. I’ve got two lists, International and “Local”. On the S.A. side it was more a case of appreciating the song, the performance and the production. Enjoy! – Billy Forrest

Artist/Song (International)

Cliff Richard & The Shadows (Live) – Miss you nights
Dobie Gray – Loving arms
Moody Blues – Nights in white satin
Dolly Parton – I will always love you
Kenny Rogers – Ruby don’t take your love to town
The Righteous Brothers – Unchained melody
The Walker Brothers – Make it easy on yourself
The Beatles – Yesterday
The Rolling Stones – Satisfaction
Matt Monroe – Born free
Dion Warwick – Valley of the dolls
Mike & The Mechanics – The living years
Elvis Presley – Are you lonesome tonight
Tom Jones – What’s new pussycat
Richard Harris – McArthur park
Abba – Fernando
K.D.Lang – Hallelujah
Elton John – Sacrifice
Mamas & Papas – California dreaming
Josh Grobin – You raise me up

Artist/Song (Local)

June Dyer – Whirlpool of love
Dickie Loader & The Blue Jeans – Exclusively yours
The Flames – For your precious love
The Dream Merchants – Time and the river
The Staccatos – Cry to me
Clout – Substitute
Bright Blue – Weeping
McCully Workshop – The Buccaneer
Copperfield – So you win again
Ballyhoo – Man on the moon
Rabbitt – Charlie
Joanna Field – Don’t fly too high
Maria – Clap your hands and stamp your feet
Gene Rockwell – Heart
Ken.J.Larkin – Turn around
Johnny Clegg – Scatterlings of Africa
Margaret Singana – Mama Tembu’s wedding
Steve Hofmeyr – Pampoen
Laurika Rauch – Kinders van die wind
Sias Reinecke – Sproetjies

Thanks to Marq Vas’s Southern African Music Collectibles

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