Mabu Vinyl featured in 40 Things To Do In Cape Town Under R200 | Travelstart

From travelstartblog

We’re almost halfway through 2014 and Cape Town is still enjoying the spoils of the momentum she’s gathered from numerous international press mentions from the New York Times to TripAdvisor and The Telegraph. Cape Town is now firmly on the world map as a destination unmissable. Table Mountain now joins the likes of the Statue of Liberty, The Gherkin, the Eifel Tower, Burj Khalifa, Sydney Opera House and the Shanghai Tower; a newly tacked on natural edifice on the tapestry of the world’s iconic cities.

But what lies beyond its beautiful mountain, historical Robben Island, wine regions and most popular sights? With this comprehensive list of alternative things to do in Cape Town we encourage you to explore the other side of the city. Discover Cape Town’s unique culture, people and history through outdoor activities, restaurants and bars and museums. We help you uncover 40 places around Cape Town to eat, play, shop, celebrate and relax, as well as an attractive smattering of free things to do in Cape Town.

Browse and buy vinyl at Mabu

Mabu Vinyl Cape Town

Cost: Vinyl – from R50 to R600. Shooting the breeze with Stephen – priceless.

The art of record collecting is alive and well in Cape Town City Bowl where Mabu Vinyl is at the forefront of this niche sub-culture. Stephen Segerman of Searching for Sugar Man fame is co-owner of the store and is usually available for a spirited chat about the 2012 hit movie in which he featured. Mabu stocks a rare selection of classics with a catalogue including second-hand records, books, comics, CDs, DVDs and cassettes. The store in Gardens is open 7 days a week.

Contact: 021 423 7635  | View location

THE REVIVAL OF THE VINYL RECORD | CNBCAfrica

This past weekend marked World Record Store day, which celebrated independent record stores and brought together music lovers from all over the globe. Now, despite a drop in CD sales and even music downloads, demand for LPs is the highest it’s been in decades. CNBC Africa’s Benedict Pather reveals why vinyl records are no longer a thing of the past.

http://www.cnbcafrica.com/video/?bctid=3497780358001

Welcome to the new Mabu Vinyl Online Store!

Mabu Vinyl is the independent record store in Cape Town that has become very well known internationally thanks to its appearance in the Oscar-winning documentary ‘Searching For Sugar Man’.

The Mabu Vinyl range of T-shirts is now available to buy online and the T-shirt prices include shipping by registered airmail to anywhere in the world.

Watch out for a range of new items being added to the store on a regular basis……

Please visit http://shop.mabuvinyl.co.za to place your orders.

Dead Men Don’t Tour, Rodriguez in South Africa 1998 (TV Documentary) | SugarMan.org

Dead Men Don’t Tour, Rodriguez in South Africa 1998 (TV Documentary)

Footage from this documentary features strongly in the Oscar winning film, Searching For Sugar Man.

Directed by Tonia Selley, Dead Men Don’t Tour, was first broadcast on SABC 3 at 9.30pm on the 5th July 2001 just after ‘Ripley’s Believe Or Not’.

This film features wonderful concert footage, backstage antics, interviews with Craig Bartholomew Strydom and Stephen “Sugar” Segerman, Rodriguez and his family, the promoters, the fans and the musicians.

All live footage was filmed at the concerts in Pretoria, Durban and the Blues Room in Johannesburg.

The soundtrack for the documentary is based on the Live Fact CD with video collages from the various performances. The concert footage is linked with interviews, backstage antics, rehearsals, etc.

  1. I Wonder
  2. Inner City Blues
  3. Jane S. Piddy
  4. Sugar Man
  5. A Most Disgusting Song
  6. Like Janis
  7. Establishment Blues
  8. Climb Up On My Music
  9. I Wonder by Generation EXT (filmed during the studio recording)
  10. Forget It

Produced by Incha Productions
Executive producers: Georgina Parkin and Charles Watson
Directed by Tonia Selley
Edited by Cathy Winter

Footage from this documentary features strongly in the Oscar winning film, Searching For Sugar Man.

Music Exchange Workshop 23 March: Web Development and SugarMan.org

In 1997, Stephen “Sugar” Segerman set up a website, called ‘The Great Rodriguez Hunt’, with the intention of finding any information about the mysterious US musician of ‘Cold Fact’ fame. In the same year Brian Currin established ‘Climb Up On My Music’, a tribute site to the life and works of Rodriguez.

Brian Currin
Brian Currin

In 1998, when Rodriguez was discovered, alive and well and living in Detroit, the search was over and those two websites were combined into one central online repository for all information about Rodriguez.

Brian Currin will be holding a one-hour workshop on the various cost effective tools and platforms that musicians and music-related businesses can and should be embracing for online marketing and sales.

Brian loves the internet. He is a freelance Web Marketer and Music Consultant who lives, works and plays in Cape Town, South Africa.He has been involved in the sales and marketing of technology products since the early 80′s, holding various sales, marketing and management positions with Panasonic, Hicor and Sony.

Since 1997, Brian has been helping many South African brands, bands and businesses establish a presence on the internet.

He is a sought-after speaker and has spoken at many conferences and workshops. Included among these are Music Exchange, Moshito Music Conference, Locksmith Association Of South Africa, Campus Of Performing Arts, Varsity Newspaper Conference (UCT) and The Academy Of Sound Engineering. His well-received presentations cover topics such as Cost Effective Web Marketing, Getting Your Brand Online, and How To Be Self-Employed.

He has two adult sons with whom he is well-pleased. He enjoys laughing, cooking, eating, music, reading, dragons, science fiction, watching TV and can usually be found on the internet.

Rodriguez: The John Samson Story

Guest post by John Samson, author of Cold Fiction.

Cold Fiction
Cold Fiction
Cold Fact (SA)
Cold Fact (SA)

I often joke with people in the UK that I didn’t leave South Africa of my own free will, but was actually kicked out because I was not fanatical about rugby and I didn’t drink, both activities that white South African males are meant to excel at. I could also have said in 1996, when I moved from South Africa to the UK, that a further reason for my being exiled was that I did not own a copy of ‘Cold Fact’ by Rodriguez. However no one in the UK would have understood what I was talking about.

But now with Malik Bendjelloul’s brilliant film ‘Searching For Sugar Man’ bringing Rodriguez to the world’s attention, I can mention the omission in my music collection and not be met with question mark faces. I am still not a huge rugby fan and have not taken to drinking alcohol, but I did rectify the lack of ‘Cold Fact’ problem on one of my early trips back to SA a couple of years after moving. I had been familiar with the album’s distinctive cover from many an hour spent flicking through the albums at my local record shop, but as a teenager in the 80’s I was hell bent on finding the next big New Romantic band and had no interest in ‘fossil music’ as I thought of it back then.

Searching For Sugar Man
Searching For Sugar Man

A further reason for the lack of ‘Cold Fact’ in my collection was that I managed to avoid military training (where a lot of guys were introduced to Rodriguez’ music) and counted my days working at the Receiver of Revenue, which I regarded as the lesser of two evils. Purchasing ‘Cold Fact’ became almost mandatory when I was lucky enough to befriend Brian Currin and Stephen ‘Sugar’ Segerman, both of whom played a part in discovering the fate of Rodriguez. I was drawn into the world of the SA Rock Digest, an online music magazine focussing on South African Rock music, which Brian and Sugar had set up. With two such music aficionados as friends, I quickly discovered gaping holes in my music knowledge, especially regarding the rock scene in South African in the 70’s.

I began to correct this problem so as not to look foolish in front of my new found friends and part of the polyfilla (spackling paste to those not familiar with this brand) to mend the gaps was purchasing a copy of ‘Cold Fact.’ I don’t recall ever having heard the album before that and, given its banned status on the radio, could not have unknowingly heard it there, but as the first chords of ‘Sugar Man’ wafted through my speakers, I knew the song. It was as if it was a part of the ether in South Africa and had just soaked into me whether I had heard it or not. ‘I Wonder’ was also familiar to me and the rest of the album, although less soaked in, was also striking a nagging familiar chord.

Yes, unless you believe in the collective consciousness, I must have heard the album somewhere before that ‘first’ listen, but I cannot for the life of me remember where. That said, a part of me does like to believe that the music was just in the air we breathed in SA, that it was, and will always just somehow be there, as essentially part of life as oxygen and sunshine. This image, to me, seems to fit in with the mystical and almost mythical character that is Rodriguez.

Searching For Sugar Man
Searching For Sugar Man

Brian, My Web Guy

Brian Currin is known to many of his friends and clients as “My Web Guy” and to a number of people all over the world as “a guy who knows a bit about music“.

These people say ... Brian is My Web Guy
These people say … Brian is My Web Guy

A few of his recent and current projects include:

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