South African Prog Rock Vol. 1: 1968 to 1982

sa-prog-1

A mix of South African Progressive Rock tracks from 1968 to 1982. Artists featured include Freedoms Children, Abstract Truth, Hawk, Otis Waygood, Duncan Mackay and Third Eye.

More info on all these artists at http://www.rock.co.za

The Mabu Vinyl Blue Trommel Basement aka “The Basement”

Mabu Vinyl Blue Trommel Basement
Mabu Vinyl Blue Trommel Basement

The Mabu Vinyl Blue Trommel Basement, to give it its full official name, is a section of the Mabu Vinyl Storeroom, which is situated in Oranjezicht, just a short distance from the Mabu Vinyl shop in Gardens.

 

While Mabu Vinyl’s well-known shop in Rheede Street will always be filled to the rafters with lots of great records, CDs, DVDs, books, cassettes and other cool stuff, the Blue Trommel Basement is mainly for those vinyl customers and collectors looking for the more collectable and rare records.

 

“The Basement” (or “The Trommels”), as these rooms are affectionately known, is where the more valuable and collectable records that come into Mabu Vinyl, all in top-end condition, can be found. Here you will find a wide selection of international and SA pressings, some of which are sold on eBay, as well as to private buyers and collectors from all over the world who visit the Basement.

 

There are plenty of LPs, 10″ albums, 7″ singles, 12″ maxis, and rare CDs in stock in the “The Trommels”, which is run by Jacques Vosloo, who personally inspects all the new incoming vinyl for imports in either mint or excellent condition, as well as South African pressings in the same shape.

 

A small section of “The Basement” stock can be found in the Mabu Vinyl shop, to give customers an idea of what stock is there and the prices, but anyone wanting to see more records in that condition, can arrange an appointment with Jacques to visit the Basement.

 

Due to the facts that The Basement is based at a private house, and Jacques is sometimes out looking at batches of vinyl, appointments to visit the Basement can only be made by contacting Jacques directly and arranging a time. The address and directions will be given at that stage.

 

Please phone or SMS Jacques on 0799228585 between 11am and 3pm, Tuesdays to Fridays, to make an appointment to visit the Blue Trommel Basement in Oranjezicht, Cape Town.

email: basement@mabuvinyl.co.za

https://www.facebook.com/mabubasement

 

Ingrid Jonker: Die Kind Is Nog Jonger available at Mabu Vinyl

INGRID JONKER
“Die Kind Is Nog Jonger”
(The Child Is Still Younger)
36-artist double tribute album

a Flamedrop Productions & Sound Action Promotions release

“Die Kind Is Nog Jonger”, the much anticipated multi-artist tribute album to acclaimed South African poet Ingrid Jonker is seeing the light of day on Friday 3 June!
It will be released on double CD and download (the limited edition vinyl pressed in the UK will only be available from July)
– CD cat. # : FDROP 002
– LP cat. # : FRDOP 003

Jonker’s daughter Simone (and husband Ernesto of Sound Action) passed her mother’s timeless words on to 36 diverse artists, to interpret as the poetry moved them. The result was a deep, passionate, exciting and undeniably relevant piece of art, bringing a literary icon and South African music together for a brand new rebirth, not only for Jonker’s words that still resonate half a century after her tragic death, but also refocusing the lens on what local music as a whole, and Afrikaans music in particular can, and should be – world class.
It is however not limiting, with 11 of the 36 songs English translations.

The artists on this independent release span 5 decades (including living legends, struggle era stalwarts, award winners, well-known and new names, expatriates & some internationals), and encapsulate a vast array of genres further expanding this historic collection’s appeal (please see all participants in the track listing below).

Sample clip of all tracks at

Some videos have been produced for selected tracks, with more on its way.
They can be accessed in the Ingrid Jonker playlist at www.youtube.com/FlamedropProductions

For on-line shoppers the first CD run will be available to order at www.raru.co.za and www.loot.co.za or on foot it can be picked up at indie record stores like Revolution and Mabu Vinyl (Cape Town), High Fidelity (Killarney Mall, Joburg), Top CD and Music Moods (Pretoria / Centurion area). Various countrywide Exclusive Books branches will be stocking it soon with more stores & outlets to be added.

The digital option for worldwide mp3 download is currently available via CD Baby:
http://www.cdbaby.com/cd/ingridjonkerdiekindisnog
while in the next few weeks all major download stores will have it available, from iTunes, Google Play and Amazon mp3, to streaming services like Spotify and new South African location Liedjie.com

Get all details, updates and where the collection can be acquired at:
www.flamedrop.com/ingridjonker

Album Tracklisting:

Disc 1

1. Ingrid Jonger, Tim Parr & Dawie Goldberg – Toemaar Die Donker Man
2. Ernestine Deane – Die Kind
3. Anton Goosen – ‘n Hemel Vol Blou Akkers (Plant Vir My ‘n Boom André)
4. Stefan Strydom (feat. Gert Vlok Nel) – Ingrid
5. Jennifer Ferguson – Windliedjie
6. Abraham van Geenbybel – Donker Stroom
7. Rambling Bones – Summer (For Simone)
8. Falling Mirror – 25 December 1960
9. Andrew Kay – Fragment
10. Terminatryx – Ontvlugting
11. mike dickman – I Went In Search Of My Body
12. Tonia Möller – Man En Vrou
13. The Wilde Junge – Police Protection Guaranteed
14. André van Rensburg – Liedjie Van Die Troebadoer
15. The SlashDogs – Lied Van Die Graf Grawer
16. The Sighs Of Monsters – Drawing
17. Die Naaimasjiene – Mamma
18. Robbi Robb (feat. Amritakripa) – Face Of Love

Disc 2

1. Inge Beckmann – Korreltjie Sand
2. Kalahari Surfers – Klein Hande
3. Jim Neversink – Bitterbessie Dagbreek
4. Beeskraal Revival – Verlore Stad
5. Daniel Eeuwrick (feat. Piet Botha) – Aan Uys Krige
6. Somerfaan – Ontnugtering
7. Anne Van Schothorst – Ek Het Gedink
8. Ivan Kadey – Tokolosh
9. Radio Rats – Deep Dark Introverted Girl
10. Francois Breytenbach Blom & Ingrid Jonker – Die Kind
11. Eckard Potgieter – Ontvlugting
12. Victor Wolf – Ballade Van Drie Vriende
13. The CapTn (feat. Julie Hartley) – Reclaimed Land
14. Juliana Venter – Hierdie Reis
15. Dirk Ace – Van ‘n Skilder
16. The McClones – I Am With Those
17. Mavis Vermaak – Heimwee Na Kaapstad
18. Zaria – Begin Somer

Album conceived & compiled by Ernesto Garcia Marques & Simone Jonker
Produced by Paul Blom & Ernesto Garcia Marques
Executive Producers: Paul Blom & Jacques Blom
Honorary Executive Producers: Deon Maas, Joyce Gonin, Marq Vas,
Anne Myers, Eckard Potgieter, Andrew King, Salomé Theart-Peddle
Mastered by Peter Pearlson
Cover ocean scene artwork by Vernon Swart / Ingrid Jonker portrait
by Jonel Scholtz / Cover design & layout by Paul Blom

Record Store Day – Cape Town, 16th April 2016

Record Store Day 2016

Record Store Day is an annual event, founded in 2007, held on the third Saturday of April each year to celebrate the culture of the independently owned record store. The day brings together fans, artists, and thousands of independent record stores across the world” . We are creating an area that allows our customers to celebrate what is vinyl & music. I have asked the finest record stores in Cape Town to take part in this collaboration.

Loads of vinyl / Hifi promos

DJ / Live Music / Open mic

Food / Beers / Wine / Coffee

https://www.facebook.com/events/1725608917652411/

For The Love Of Vinyl … | Atlantic Sun, 24 March 2016

For The Love Of Vinyl

There’s something about carefully
placing the needle into the groove of
a record, then carefully having to lift
it again to turn the record around and listen
to the other side. It’s the kind of interaction
with music you just don’t get when
listening to a CD in the front-loader of your
car or a digital file on your phone or MP3
player.
The allure of vinyl has seen many a
music-lover dedicate a room or more to
house precious collections, with Martin
Scorsese and Mick Jagger even naming
their TV series homage to the 70s US
recording scene in honour of the format.
With World Record Store Day (April
16), on the horizon, Atlantic Sun speaks to
two vinyl enthusiasts, record store owner
Stephen Segerman and Paul Waxon, DJ
and organiser of one of the city’s hottest
vinyl-only parties.
Stephen, the co-owner of Mabu Vinyl
record store owner, and also one of the
men who initiated the search for folk
singer Rodriguez documented in the film
Searching for Sugarman, said that it is great
to see the younger generation coming into
his store and buying records.
“I can only talk from experience from
my own shop which is now 15 years old –
and according to the Oranjezicht residents,
that is a long time for a record shop in
Cape Town.”
Stephen, who says he “grew up going to
record stores and loving record stores” was
born and raised in Johannesburg and
studied at Wits University. He worked with
his dad at a jewellery factory for 20 years
and in the 90s he decided to move to Cape
Town.
“I watched as CD’s came and records
disappeared and people gave up on them.
I didn’t, because I didn’t want to give up
my records.” Stephen said his business
partner, Jacques Vosloo, started the shop
on Kloof Street, not far from their current
location in Rheede Street.
“Across the road, where Vida Café is
now, was a double shop. It was a secondhand
shop called Kloof Mart and it was his
dad’s shop. Jacques bought a batch of
records and turned part of the shop into a
record store.” This was the beginning of
Mabu Vinyl. They have been in there current
location for the last eight years. “I’d
been a big customer in his shop and
helped him advertise. In the 13 years that
we’ve built this shop and moved here
(about eight years ago) we’ve seen nothing
but the rise of vinyl. Vinyl has been massive
and come back.”
He said that originally the shop just
focused on dance, trance and house
records.
“This is what kept vinyl alive. Slowly as
DJs started using computers and CDs, pop,
rock soul and jazz records became popular
again. There were record shops where you
could buy (vinyl) records which there hadn’t
been for years.”
“With electronics you won’t be able to
touch things, put a needle on it and get that kind
of quality. We’ve watched records become popular
with the younger generation which is wonderful.
There are thousands of records out there.”
At Mabu Vinyl, they only sell second-hand
records. “We have a saying that the universe has to
bring it to us. In the old days these records were
analogue and you could feel the sound. These new
records are made digitally and then converted to
vinyl. It doesn’t have the same soul,” said Stephen.
“People nowadays download tracks but we grew
up listening to whole albums. You had Ziggy Stardust
and you would put it on your record player.
You looked at the cover to find out who the musicians
were. After 20 minutes you had to turn it over
and listen to the other side. I still think that people
who love music want to hear the whole album.
What we’ve seen now is that this analogue world has
come back. It has a place and it is not going anywhere
because these records are valuable.”
“We are supportive of World Record Store Day
but we are not going to go out and get new records
just for it. We are a 365 day celebration. We are all
music addicts and it is wonderful that this addiction
has bought records back.”
DJ Paul Waxon said he has been collecting vinyl
records since he was young and started his WaxOn
events, at The Waiting Room, two and a half years
ago because he just loved playing music.
“I have been collecting records and DJing for a
long time. I stopped for a while when everything
went to digital. I went away on a holiday with my
friends and I realised how much I missed playing
music to people.”
He said that he also knew that the only way he
would get back into it again would be with vinyl
records. “I’m not a purist but I didn’t enjoy playing
the CDs and MP3s. I started my event because I
wanted to play music in the way I wanted to.” Vinyl,
he said, was the only format being played in the
clubs up until the early 2000s, and it was this scene
that contributed to keeping vinyl alive when many
vinyl pressing plants were shutting down.
It was the introduction of CDs to the market
which pretty much killed off vinyl sales. Then came
digital formats such as MP3, which turned the
music industry on its head, challenging recording
companies and music stores to reconsider their traditional
ways of looking at the music business.
Over the past few years, however, vinyl has
regained its popularity. “They started Record Store
Day to create interest in a broad way,” said Paul. “It
put some weight behind and sales started growing
on a very rapid scale. We are close to the point
where vinyl will outsell CDs in the next couple of
years.
But it hasn’t all been positive, with record pricing
often in the upper-hundreds as everyone seeks
to cash in on the renewed interest in the vinyl
record.
Now the big major record labels have jumped
on to it. The people that kept the plants open were
doing small indie rock bands and electronic music.
They are reissuing albums now that are already
there and also overpricing the new records. I saw
a Saturday Night Fever album for R500.
“I feel like we should promote our own music in
this country. If we want to promote Record Store
Day we have to find a way to support local music
and not just bring in old re-issues.
“There is a lot of music from the 60s and 70s that
sit in our record stores and nobody cares about it.
Then what happens is people overseas find them
and reissue them. Then they become popular. We
need to value our own music more. If I find the
right store, I walk out of there really happy.”

Pictures of Glastonbury 2014: 19 Amazing New Acts You Can’t Miss – Photos – NME.COM

John Wizards
John Wizards

Glastonbury 2014: 19 Amazing New Acts You Can’t MissJohn Wizards The Cape Town-based act mixed traditional African influences, funk and gentle electronica on last year’s well-recieved self-titled debut LP. Reminding critics of everyone from Vampire Weekend to Parliament, we’ll just say they’re experts when it comes to magical, wide-eyed pop.

via Pictures of Glastonbury 2014: 19 Amazing New Acts You Can’t Miss – Photos – NME.COM.

The 10 best … record stores | City Press

From City Press

The old art of record collecting is still alive as independent record shops crop up across SA despite the growth of online music sales. Percy Mabandu lists 10 of his best

Mabu Vinyl
1 Mabu Vinyl
This tune emporium was established in 2001 by Jacques Vosloo, who now co-owns it with Stephen Segerman. The store was memorialised in the
Oscar-winning documentary Searching for Sugarman
in which it featured extensively. It stocks a rare selection of classics with a catalogue including second-hand records, books, comics, CDs, DVDs and cassettes. The average price of a record is R80 and the store is open seven days a week.
2 Rheede Street, Gardens, Cape Town
mabuvinyl.co.za

Read more >>>

Stephen Segerman speaks to Daily Maverick about Malik Bendjelloul

From Daily Maverick

Malik Bendjelloul, the Swedish director of ‘Searching for Sugar Man’, has committed suicide aged 36. It’s just over a year since the documentary about folk musician Rodriguez won Bendjelloul an Oscar and captured the hearts of viewers all over the world. REBECCA DAVIS spoke to Bendjelloul’s subject and friend, Cape Town record-store owner Stephen ‘Sugar’ Segerman.

The last time I interviewed Stephen Segerman in his den in Oranjezicht, it was July 2012, just prior to the official release of Searching for Sugar Manin South Africa. At that time Segerman gave the impression of a man both bemused and exhilarated by the success of the film, in which he features prominently as one of two South Africans who made it their mission to track down Rodriguez.

Shortly before the interview, he’d been to the Sundance Film Festival with Bendjelloul and Rodriguez, where the film received a standing ovation. “It was just a magical night,” he told me at the time.

Watch: Searching for Sugar Man trailer

Almost two years later, the fairytale seemed even rosier. Searching for Sugar Man won the Best Documentary Oscar at the 2013 Academy Awards. Rodriguez, who languished in obscurity for years, today has fame and fortune locked down. It was the ultimate feel-good story.

And then, on Tuesday, shocking news broke: Bendjelloul, aged just 36, was dead.

“You know, with some people you have inklings and maybes. With Malik? Suicide? Impossible,” says Segerman, shaking his head. “I thought he must have died in his sleep or something. When I heard, well…” he trails off. “I’ve been seeing the comments. This dude had the world at his feet, he had an Oscar…”

Malik Bendjelloul was a teen actor in his native Sweden, starring in a show which Segerman describes as the Swedish version of America’s Family Ties. As an adult he worked as a TV reporter for Sweden’s public broadcaster, specialising in making short films about visiting rockstars. Then he left to travel the world, looking for richer stories.

Segerman first heard from Bendjelloul in late 2006, when he emailed the record-store owner to say that he was coming to Cape Town, and asked if they could meet. He had learnt about Segerman’s involvement in the Rodriguez tale through a piece in the Guardian, and wanted to hear more.

“At that stage we had a shop on the corner of Long Street with lekker big glass windows,” remembers Segerman. “I can still see him coming around the corner and saying: ‘Hello, I’m Malik!’”

In an interview with Movie Scope Magazine in July 2012, Bendjelloul described the encounter:

“I met Stephen ‘Sugar’ Segerman, the guy who first started to look for Rodriguez in Cape Town, and when he told me the story I was just blown away. It was just so beautiful and touching. Just the one-sentence summary was pretty strong: ‘A man who doesn’t know that he is a superstar.’”

For his part, Segerman instantly warmed to the lanky Swede.

“He just had such a lovely energy: tall, bright-eyed…He reminded me of Tintin,” he says.

Segerman took him up Table Mountain and Bendjelloul filmed a short sequence of Segerman telling the story of the hunt for Rodriguez. Then he disappeared off to Sweden, and Segerman didn’t hear from him for six months. At that point, Bendjelloul emailed to say: that’s the story we like in Sweden.

Bendjelloul returned to Cape Town and shot a one-minute trailer in Segerman’s den. He took it to the Sheffield Documentary Festival, where aspirant filmmakers pitch their stories. Bendjelloul won. A full-length documentary was on the cards.

Segerman points to a photograph pinned to a cabinet. It shows Segerman, Bendjelloul and camera woman Camilla Skagerström. “That was the team,” he says. “Just them. They came here and shot, then went to Detroit. There was barely any budget. Just – excuse the cliché – passion.”

rebecca-Malik-dies-better-days.jpg

Photo: Stephen Segerman, cinematographer Camilla Skagerström, and filmmaker Malik Bendjelloul, pictured in Segerman’s den in Cape Town.

In Detroit, there was the tricky business of persuading the reclusive Rodriguez to feature in the film at all. Bendjelloul worked his way in by meeting the musician’s family members one by one. He got his way eventually through sheer charm, Segerman says. Even so, filming Rodriguez had certain unique challenges. There’s a scene in the film where Rodriguez is fiddling with a video microphone while he talks. It still had to be used: there was no question of a do-over.

“There was always only gonna be one take,” Segerman chuckles. “No way was Rodriguez going to say all those things all over again.”

For over a year, Bendjelloul sat in his flat in Stockholm making the film. People promised funding and backed out. He ran out of money for animation, so he had to do the animation work himself. It’s the stuff of legends now that some scenes in the documentary had to be filmed using a $1 Super-8 iPhone app.

“That movie is sort of a bit jerry-built – kind of smashed together,” says Segerman. “I saw it for the first time and thought: That doesn’t look anything like movies I’ve checked, slick, beautifully-made documentaries!”

But the film’s sheer heart – and the incredible story it told – more than compensated for its technical weaknesses. Some suggested that the story was a little too incredible – that Bendjelloul had conveniently omitted aspects of the Rodriguez narrative that didn’t easily fit within the rags-to-riches trajectory.

“There were two main snipes about the film,” Segerman says today. “The first was that Rodriguez wasn’t actually an anti-Apartheid hero – which I never said. The other criticism is about Australia.” Bendjelloul’s documentary left out the fact that Rodriguez was aware that he had a major fan-base in Australia, and had toured there twice in the late 70s and early 80s.

“The simple explanation, which we spoke about, is that [Searching for Sugar Man] is about the search of two South Africans for Rodriguez,” Segerman says. “I found out about the Australian tour the night that I met Rodriguez for the first time, in March 1998. If I’d known, I would have tracked him through Australia! It was not part of our story.”

Segerman says Bendjelloul was unruffled by this criticism. “It made zero difference,” he says. “For him to create something which brought so much happiness into the world…Nothing could have bothered him about that.”

Segerman and Craig Bartholomew, the music journalist who also features in the documentary as instrumental in the hunt for Rodriguez, attended the Oscars with Bendjelloul last year.

From his wallet, Segerman extracts a piece of card on which he’d jotted down ideas for an acceptance speech for Bendjelloul, since the filmmaker hadn’t prepared anything.

“I’m superstitious about preparing speeches – this has been lucky for me,” it begins.

In the end, the laconic Swede didn’t need the prompt. “Oh boy!” Bendjelloul said when he won. “Thanks to one of the greatest singers ever, Rodriguez!”

There’s a photo in Segerman’s den of the three men tux-ed up, Bendjelloul clutching his statuette, at the prestigious Vanity Fair after-party.

“Just on my left side, over there,” says Segerman, pointing at the photo, “there was this old American dude. I thought: who’s that? He obviously wasn’t an actor.” He pauses. “It was Buzz Aldrin. For a baby-boomer like me, you don’t get any better than that. I met Buzz Aldrin, and then I went home.”

Interviewed by the New York Times in May last year as part of a list of ’20 Filmmakers To Watch’, Bendjelloul hinted at the surreal aspects of having made such a successful first film.

“Since everything was the first time for me, it was a bit confusing to understand what last year was all about,” Bendjelloul admitted. “To travel around with your film is a weird experience. Filmmakers are not musicians, they can’t perform their film; you don’t even need to load the projector. It was weird to think that that year was the reward for the work. But now I realise that it’s this year that is the reward. To feel free to do exactly what you want to do without feeling too scared that your ideas won’t interest anyone or worry about the rent or having to deal with people who think they know better.”

After the Oscars, Segerman says Bendjelloul was besieged with offers.

“Malik had been turning down a huge amount of stuff. He had a lot of offers of TV commercials, that kind of thing, but he wasn’t the type of guy to sell out. Your first full-length movie wins an Oscar! What the hell do you do for a second?”

In fact, for his next major project, Segerman said Bendjelloul had turned again to a South African story. He was working on a screenplay for a feature film inspired by the experiences of conservationist Lawrence Anthony, dubbed ‘the elephant whisperer’ for his work with traumatised elephants.

“He loved South Africa,” Segerman says. “I always say he should have been an honorary Capetonian. You have no idea how many people found out about Cape Town from his movie. He made it look so beautiful.”

Bendjelloul didn’t let his newfound fame go to his head, according to Segerman. “He always looked a little bit shy, a little bit awkward. It’s not an easy thing to deal with.”

Segerman was last in touch with the filmmaker last Monday, when the two had an email exchange about a legal dispute unfolding between two of Rodriguez’s old record labels. He says Bendjelloul gave no sign at all that anything was emotionally amiss.

“You know, through the film… My little record shop became a great little record shop. Rodriguez found his destiny. Malik, I thought, had found his,” Segerman says.

“You put something like that out there. The joy that I’ve got out of it – how much more so for Malik? And it wasn’t enough.” DM

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